Reading Room Blog

Fast Track Books at the Library

 Check the back seat of the car and under the bed – it’s Food for Fines Week, and that means you can return your overdue library books and do a good deed at the same time. Through next Sunday, for every canned good or non-perishable item that you bring to any branch of the Central Rappahannock Regional Library, we'll deduct a dollar from your overdue fines, up to a maximum amount of $10.00. All contributions go to local food banks.

          While you’re at the library, be sure to take a look at the exhibits. This month at the Headquarters Library, matchbox cars from the collection of Jeremy Harrison fill the second floor exhibit case. Dozens of brightly painted metal cars are set up in and around a garage, complete with service bays, ramps and even a heliport. 

          After your children have had their fill of the exhibit, be sure to check out a few books for young auto enthusiasts.

On This Day in History: Exploring the Titanic

On April 15, 1912 the British luxury liner RMS Titanic struck an iceberg and sank on its maiden voyage from Southampton, England to New York City. About 1500 lives were lost in this terrible tragedy that captivated the world in its aftermath. In 1985, the Titanic was discovered "lying upright in two pieces on the ocean floor at a depth of about 4,000 m (about 13,000 feet)." (Britannica). A 1993 expedition enabled salvagers to recover several hundred artifacts from the rusting wreck.

The library has many books and movies that explore, through fiction and non-fiction, the Titanic's voyage and demise. A keyword search in the catalog reveals selections for all age groups. A new book, Titanic's Last Secrets: The Further Adventures of Shadow Divers John Chatterton and Richie Kohler, is on order and looks promising. 

American Life in Poetry: Column 212

by Ted Kooser, U.S. Poet Laureate, 2004-2006

We've published this column about American life for over four years, and we have finally found a poem about one of the great American pastimes, bowling. "The Big Lebowski" caught bowling on film, and this poem by Regan Huff of Georgia captures it in words.

Occurrence on Washburn Avenue

A Clutch of Eggy Picture Books

Whether your family is dying Easter eggs, roasting eggs for Passover, or simply celebrating the arrival of spring, you’ll enjoy this clutch of picture books about all things eggy.

American Life in Poetry: Column 211

 by Ted Kooser, U.S. Poet Laureate, 2004-2006

Some of you are so accustomed to flying that you no longer sit by the windows. But I'd guess that at one time you gazed down, after dark, and looked at the lights below you with innocent wonder. This poem by Anne Marie Macari of New Jersey perfectly captures the gauziness of those lights as well as the loneliness that often accompanies travel.

From the Plane

It is a soft thing, it has been sifted
from the sieve of space and seems
asleep there under the moths of light.

If you like Harry Potter for Adults...

Harry Potter

Thanks for requesting a Book Match from the Central Rappahannock Regional Library. You asked us to match the Harry Potter novels, citing the adventure, fight against evil, political thinking, warfare, and drama. How about trying one of more of these:

Dune series by Frank Herbert
Set in the far future amidst a sprawling feudal interstellar empire where planetary fiefdoms are controlled by noble Houses that owe an allegiance to the Imperial House Corrino, Dune tells the story of young Paul Atreides (heir apparent to Duke Leto Atreides and scion of House

American Life in Poetry: Column 210

by Ted Kooser, U.S. Poet Laureate, 2004-2006

My father was the manager of a store in which chairs were strategically placed for those dutiful souls waiting and waiting and waiting and waiting for shoppers. Such patience is the most exhausting work there is, or so it seems at the time. This poem by Joseph O. Legaspi perfectly captures one of those scenes.

At the Bridal Shop

If you like "Bird by Bird" by Anne Lamott ...

I am going to recommend some memoirs, some funnier than others, and also some novels that are based, somewhat, on the writers' lives.

Memoirs:
Angela's Ashes, by Frank McCourt: Listen to the audio recording read by the author, if you can. When he describes his father singing, McCourt sings the Irish songs for you. That added to my enjoyment of this wonderful book.

The Glass Castle, by Jeannette Walls

If you like books by Janet Evanovich...

Thanks for requesting a Book Match from the Central Rappahannock Regional Library! You asked for series books with characters similar to Stephanie Plum, created by Janet Evanovich. Well! Here are some suggestions for funny heroines in series escapades:

Daredevil Ladies

Well-behaved women seldom make history, as historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich famously said. Julie Cummins’ new book, “Women Daredevils, Thrills, Chills, and Frills,” introduces ten somewhat ill-behaved but admirable women to young readers.