Reading Room Blog

American Life in Poetry: Column 205

by Ted Kooser, U.S. Poet Laureate, 2004-2006

Memories have a way of attaching themselves to objects, to details, to physical tasks, and here, George Bilgere, an Ohio poet, happens upon mixed feelings about his mother while slicing a head of cabbage.

Corned Beef and Cabbage

American Life in Poetry: Column 204

by Ted Kooser, U.S. Poet Laureate, 2004-2006

Memories form around details the way a pearl forms around a grain of sand, and in this commemoration of an anniversary, Cecilia Woloch reaches back to grasp a few details that promise to bring a cherished memory forward, and succeeds in doing so. The poet lives and teaches in southern California.

Anniversary

If you like suspense and thrillers

Thanks for e-mailing the Central Rappahannock Regional Library for a Book Match. You did not specify a book, but you did mention that you were looking for suspense/thrillers. Since there are bunches and bunches of different kinds of suspense/thriller books, if you could give us a specific title to match, or let us know what elements you like, we can give you a better selection! As is, since your request is general, I can give you some general recommendations:

If you like the "Abhorsen" and "Harry Potter" series...

Hello!  Thanks for your request for a Book Match. If you like the "Abhorsen" and "Harry Potter" series, you may enjoy these books:

 Sandry's Book
by Tamora Pierce
Four young misfits learn how to use their unrecognized magical powers.
Part of the Circle of Magic series.

The Lives of Christopher Chant
by Diana Wynne Jones
A young wizard with nine lives is destined to become the Chrestomanci, or head sorcerer, of the world.Part of the Chrestomanci series.
 

If You Liked "Talk before Sleep" by Elizabeth Berg, You Might Enjoy Reading …

Talk Before Sleep


Other books by Elizabeth Berg

    The Day I Ate Whatever I Wanted: And Other Small Acts Of Liberation 
A compelling anthology of short fiction, including eleven never-before-published pieces, explores the lives of women breaking free of the convention that controls their lives, in a collection that includes "Returns and Exchanges," "Over the Hill and Into the Woods," and the title story, about a woman who goes on a happiness binge after ditching Weight Watchers.

The Reading Guild (Cooper)

The Reading Guild meets the third Tuesday of each month at 6:00 p.m. The group's members pick a theme like Shakespeare or travel every other month; the other months are open discussions of your favorite book or current reading. Everyone brings a dish to share! Call the Cooper Branch (804-224-0921) or check our program listing for this month's topic.

American Life in Poetry: Column 203

by Ted Kooser, U.S. Poet Laureate, 2004-2006

To read in the news that a platoon of soldiers has been killed is a terrible thing, but to learn the name of just one of them makes the news even more vivid and sad. To hold the name of someone or something on our lips is a powerful thing. It is the badge of individuality and separateness. Charles Harper Webb, a California poet, takes advantage of the power of naming in this poem about the steady extinction of animal species.

The Animals are Leaving

One by one, like guests at a late party

American Life in Poetry: Column 202

by Ted Kooser, U.S. Poet Laureate, 2004-2006

David Wagoner, who lives in Washington state, is one of our country's most distinguished poets and the author of many wonderful books. He is also one of our best at writing about nature, from which we learn so much. Here is a recent poem by Wagoner that speaks to perseverance.

The Cherry Tree

Out of the nursery and into the garden
where it rooted and survived its first hard winter,
then a few years of freedom while it blossomed,

American Life in Poetry: Column 201

by Ted Kooser, U.S. Poet Laureate, 2004-2006

Don Welch lives in Nebraska and is one of those many talented American poets who have never received as much attention as they deserve. His poems are distinguished by the meticulous care he puts into writing them, and by their deep intelligence. Here is Welch's picture of a 14-year-old, captured at that awkward and painfully vulnerable step on the way to adulthood.

At 14

To be shy,
to lower your eyes
after making a greeting.

to know
wherever you go

American Life in Poetry: Column 200

by Ted Kooser, U.S. Poet Laureate, 2004-2006

Here's a fine poem by Chris Forhan of Indiana, about surviving the loss of a parent, and which celebrates the lives that survive it, that go on. I especially like the parachute floating up and away, just as the lost father has gone up and away.

What My Father Left Behind

Jam jar of cigarette ends and ashes on his workbench,
hammer he nailed our address to a stump with,
balsa wood steamship, half-finished--