Poetry

The Fredericksburg Welsh Festival Poetry Contest, the Library, and Your Ancestors

The Fredericksburg Welsh Festival Poetry Contest, the Library, and Your Ancestor

Yes, there is a connection between the upcoming Fredericksburg Welsh Poetry Contest, the library, and your personal ancestors. Although it seems a tad far-fetched, it really is easy to see how the library can connect you to anything and anyone. Here’s how this connection works: since the library is a community center and encourages local groups to keep us informed as to their upcoming public events, we discovered that the Welsh Society of Fredericksburg is sponsoring a poetry contest as part of their upcoming annual festival this September 21. The deadline for entries is September 1.

Poetry Readings in April

Poetry Readings. Fridays in April at 4pm. England Run Library

Drop in to the England Run Branch each Friday this April at 4:00 pm for informal poetry readings in our “living room.” Bring a few poems to read or come to listen. Poems can be your own work or just ones you enjoy. If you’re a published poet, you’re welcome to bring copies of your work for people to purchase. No advance sign-up needed.

We’ll also be giving out poem scrolls all month long. Some of the poems were written by our own patrons, like this one! (posted here with permission of the author.) To submit your own poems, click here.
 

Poem scrollsSpring Snow

Winter pauses spring,
Maple and forsythia
At the ready, waiting.
Cardinals, juncos and finches
Flit and feast, 
Instinct trumps weather.

by Lori Izykowski

 

 

 

Shakespeare Bats Cleanup

By Ron Koertge

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When a fourteen-year-old baseball player catches mononucleosis, he discovers that keeping a journal and experimenting with poetry not only helps fill the time, it also helps him deal with life, love, and loss.
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Who Will Cry for the Little Boy?

By Antwone Quenton Fisher

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"With the publication of Finding Fish, his memoir of a childhood spent in foster homes in and around Cleveland, Antwone Fisher shared with the world his story of perseverance, determination, and courage. And he also showed that within him beat the heart of an artist -- a major factor in his resilience and recovery. Now with Who Will Cry for the Little Boy?, his first collection of poetry, Antwone Fisher reveals the inner truths that took him from a tumultuous childhood to the man he is today.

"The powerful poems presented here range from impressions and expressions of Antwone's years growing up to the love that he has gained from the family he made for himself as an adult. From the title poem -- which is featured prominently in the movie Antwone Fisher -- a plaintive, haunting tribute to a childhood lost to abuse and neglect, to 'Azure Indigo,' the uplifting and touching poem about his daughters, many readers will find their own feelings and experiences reflected in this lyrical and passionate collection."

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The Stars, the Snow, the Fire: Twenty-five Years in the Northern Wilderness

By John Haines

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For 25 years the poet John Haines lived, trapped, and hunted on the windswept hills above the Tanana River east of Fairbanks, Alaska. In this remarkable collection of essays he turns a poet's eye on his existence there and captures a life lived for the sake of survival.
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Snow

By Orhan Pamuk

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"Following years of lonely political exile in Western Europe, Ka, a middle-aged poet, returns to Istanbul to attend his mother’s funeral. Only partly recognizing this place of his cultured, middle-class youth, he is even more disoriented by news of strange events in the wider country: a wave of suicides among girls forbidden to wear their head scarves at school. An apparent thaw of his writer’s curiosity–-a frozen sea these many years–-leads him to Kars, a far-off town near the Russian border and the epicenter of the suicides.

"No sooner has he arrived, however, than we discover that Ka’s motivations are not purely journalistic; for in Kars, once a province of Ottoman and then Russian glory, now a cultural gray-zone of poverty and paralysis, there is also Ipek, a radiant friend of Ka’s youth, lately divorced, whom he has never forgotten. As a snowstorm, the fiercest in memory, descends on the town and seals it off from the modern, westernized world that has always been Ka’s frame of reference, he finds himself drawn in unexpected directions: not only headlong toward the unknowable Ipek and the desperate hope for love–-or at least a wife–-that she embodies, but also into the maelstrom of a military coup staged to restrain the local Islamist radicals, and even toward God, whose existence Ka has never before allowed himself to contemplate. In this surreal confluence of emotion and spectacle, Ka begins to tap his dormant creative powers, producing poem after poem in untimely, irresistible bursts of inspiration. But not until the snows have melted and the political violence has run its bloody course will Ka discover the fate of his bid to seize a last chance for happiness."

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A Barfield Sampler: Poetry and Fiction

By Owen Barfield

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"Barfield is known widely for his explorations of human consciousness, the history of language, the origins of poetic effect, and the interactionof the disciplines, especially literature and the hard sciences. This book presents Barfield as a writer of imaginative literature.

"In the stories, one finds both post-war displacement and Bloomsburian ironies. In the two short novels, Barfield gives us two stunning versions of the Apocalypse. In his poetry, he explores the varieties of human experience, often in radical relation to the past...."

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Pulitzer Prize-Winner Claudia Emerson Inducted into Fellowship of Southern Writers

Claudia Emerson

Claudia Emerson, a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and English professor at the University of Mary Washington, will be inducted into the prestigious Fellowship of Southern Writers during its biennial meeting at the Conference on Southern Literature.  Emerson won the 2006 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry for Late Wife. She has written five books of poetry, with a sixth forthcoming, and has won numerous other honors.  We are fortunate that each April she has helped our library system by judging  the Teen Poetry Contest and acting as presenter for Teen Poetry Night.

Leaves of Grass

By Walt Whitman

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"Leaves of Grass" inaugurated a new voice, style, and optimistic, bombastic vision into American letters, one that took the nation itself as subject. This classic was "Banned in Boston" in 1881 for its language.

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The Poetry of Robert Frost

By Robert Frost

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One of the most steadied and lauded American poets and for good reason. Sometimes writing for a youthful audience ("the fog comes on little cat feet...") and sometimes writing for persons of more experience ("...I took the road less traveled by, and that has made all the difference.") Revisit Frost's poetry now that you're out of English class and see what you think.

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