People with disabilities -- fiction

12/14/2017 - 1:55pm
Hello, Universe by Erin Entrada Kelly

Five kids, one well, and no coincidences. At least that’s what Kaori Tanaka, self-proclaimed 12-year-old psychic, tells her clients: no coincidences.

Of course, right now, Kaori’s psychic business is limited to an assistant—her little sister Gen—and one client—Virgil Salinas. Virgil is shy, misunderstood by everyone in his boisterous family except his Filipina grandmother, and bullied by Chet Bullens. He also needs Kaori’s help in figuring out how to approach Valencia Somerset, whom he would desperately like to befriend. Valencia is deaf, loves nature, secretly wants a friend, and has just found Kaori’s flyer at the supermarket.

12/19/2012 - 3:31am
Motherless Brooklyn by Jonathan Lethem

Only Jonathan Lethem could turn an homage to the classic noir style into a wildly inventive exploration of language, loyalty, and the principles of Zen Buddhism. Lethem’s fascination with noir played a major role in his debut novel, Gun, with Occasional Music. In Motherless Brooklyn, the reader is treated to a gritty interpretation of noir filtered through an unforgettable narrator—Lionel Essrog. As always, Lethem’s writing is superb, and the construction of Lionel’s narrative voice is a rare accomplishment.

Lionel Essrog is an inexperienced detective who has a complicated relationship with language. Lionel is always looking for an antidote – some sensation or substance that will temporarily quell the feral language percolating in his brain. White Castle hamburgers can have therapeutic properties, and fear will work in a pinch. But Lionel’s mind always reverts back to an intricate arrangement of associative tics, repetition, and wordplay.

Subscribe to People with disabilities -- fiction