Snow Branch will be closed on Saturday, August 1, for parking lot paving, weather permitting.

Civil Rights

01/27/2015 - 10:09am
Gladys Poles Todd, Courtesy of the Free Lance-Star

Gladys Poles Todd, long-time Fredericksburg resident, died recently at the age of 101, having witnessed and been a part of the city’s changeover from its days of segregation. She lived to see schools and lunch counters integrated, and she was an important force behind making that happen. Among her many works, Mrs. Todd organized sit-ins, led voter registration drives, and supervised night study programs.

Her obituary gives a goodly number of details from her long and generous life, but you may also wish to read more about her in Fitzgerald’s A Different Story: A Black History of Fredericksburg, Stafford, and Spotsylvania.

In 1997, she and other local leaders in the Civil Rights era got together for a forum at the library to discuss those difficult days. Fortunately, the program, Civil Rights: Fredericksburg’s Story, was recorded in DVD format and can be checked out.

Besides a historic legacy to be shared by the community, Mrs. Todd also left a personal record of her life. Her oral history, part of HFFI’s Pieces of Our Past series, is available to read in the Virginiana Room of the Central Rappahannock Regional Library.

Photo courtesy of The Free Lance-Star
06/20/2014 - 10:59am
Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker by Patricia Hruby Powell

Josephine Baker was an African-American singer, dancer, actor, and political activist who rose to prominence in the 1920s. In the book Josephine, written by Patricia Hruby Powell and illustrated by Christian Robinson, her astonishing life is recounted with powerful text as well as enthralling images. Her story is one of struggle, perseverance, and resilience. Her strength of character and fortitude helped her navigate the precarious pathways of life more than once.  

07/13/2012 - 11:07am
Gaye Adegbalola

This interview airs beginning July 11.
Educator, musician, and former member of the award-winning blues group “Saffire—the Uppity Blues Women,” Gaye Adegbalola shares her past as a civil rights activist and a deep lover of music with Debby Klein on CRRL Presents, a Central Rappahannock Regional Library production.

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