Education

The Homeschool Phenomenon

Not every child today learns in a big building with lots of other students all studying the same things at the same time. In the past twenty years, the homeschool phenomenon has caught fire across America.

The Shame of the Nation by Jonathan Kozol

The Shame of the Nation by Jonathan Kozol

The Shame of the Nation tries to explain the troubles within America's inner-city schools. Jonathan Kozol--a writer, teacher, and activist--explores 60 different schools in order to see firsthand the physical and mental conditions of America's educational system. There, he finds an epidemic in which school systems allow some students to fall behind the curriculum. He looks at how the country went from separate but equal schools to desegregation and back to segregated schools.

Achievement Matters: Getting Your Child the Best Education Possible

By Hugh B. Price

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In this vitally important new work, the president of the National Urban League constructs a sound and workable action plan for parents to secure for their children the education they deserve--and to which they are entitled.

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Three Cups of Tea: One Man's Mission to Promote Peace . . . One School at a Time 

Greg Mortenson

"Three Cups of Tea traces Mortenson's decade-long odyssey to build schools (especially for girls), throughout the region that gave birth to the Taliban and sanctuary to Al Qaeda. In a region where Americans are often feared and hated, he has survived kidnapping, fatwas issued by enraged mullahs, death threats, and wrenching separations from his wife and children. But his success speaks for itself--at last count, his Central Asia Institute had built fifty-five schools." (Book Description)

9780143038252
Adult

The Author

Greg Mortenson’s Official Website, http://www.gregmortenson.com/

“Greg Mortenson Nominated for Nobel Peace Prize,” http://www.californiachronicle.com/articles/view/87114

 

Reading Guide

from the publisher, http://us.penguingroup.com/static/rguides/us/three_cups_of_tea.html

 

Related Official Websites

3 Cups of Tea Official Website,  http://www.threecupsoftea.com/ with archived articles, interviews, TV and radio shows

Pennies for Peace Program,  http://www.penniesforpeace.org/

Central Asia Institute,  https://www.ikat.org/

 

Articles and Reviews

"3 Cups of Tea,” Wikipedia On-line Encyclopedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Cups_of_Tea

Review from “Al Mihrab” blog, http://almihrab.wordpress.com/2009/03/11/three-cups-of-tea/

Review from “Books on the Brain”,  http://lisamm.wordpress.com/2008/09/06/review-three-cups-of-tea-one-mans-mission-to-promote-peace-one-school-at-a-time/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great Lives Series: Booker T. Washington

Born a slave in Franklin County, Virginia, Booker T. (Taliaferro) Washington went on to become a nationally-known leader and educator. He shared his educational philosophy with U.S. presidents and served as the first president of Tuskegee Institute, now Tuskegee University.

African-American Education in Westmoreland County

By Cassandra Burton

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"...a unique study of the traditions, institutions, and people who were involved in teaching and educating the black population throughout the county. In this volume, with many never-before-published photographs, you will take a visual journey through the area's past and visit the one and two-room schoolhouses of Templemans, Potomac, and some of the smaller areas, such as Frog Hall and Mudbridge; and meet the dedicated and creative teachers and their students who studied and learned in this picturesque region nestled between the Potomac and Rappahannock Rivers."
From the publisher's description

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African-American History of Spotsylvania, Virginia

By the Spotsylvania Department of Tourism

From The Start ...

Blacks first arrived in isolated and sparsely populated Spotsylvania County along with white settlers in the early 1700's. Through the years before the Civil War, as slaves and occasionally as free men and women, they were an important force in area development. Occupations included labor as farm and plantation workers, as domestic servants, and as artisans, such as blacksmiths, carpenters, coopers, and fine needleworkers. They also worked in the iron industries, mining, construction, shipping on the Rappahannock River, and in their own businesses.

By the first half of the 19th century, Spotsylvania County's population reached about 11,000, over half of whom were black.
Alex Haley's award winning novel, Roots, cast his African ancestor, Kunta Kinte, as a slave of a Spotsylvania family.

Virginia Landmarks of Black History: Sites on the Virginia Landmarks Register and the National Register of Historic Places

By Virginia Department of Historic Resources

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Lists 64 places of interest and tells of churches' and universities' contribution to black leadership in the state.

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Fannie Richards: Integration Pioneer

From The Journal of Negro History, Volume 1, January 1916

 The following is excerpted from The Journal of Negro History, Volume 1, January 1916, pp. 30-36, which is available online at Manybooks.net.

She was born in Fredericksburg, Virginia, October 1, 1841. As her people left that State when she was quite young she did not see so much of the intolerable conditions as did the older members of the family. Miss Richards was successful in getting an early start in education. Desiring to have better training than what was then given to persons of color in Detroit, she went to Toronto. There she studied English, history, drawing and needlework. In later years she attended the Teachers Training School in Detroit. Her first thought was to take up teaching that she might do something to elevate her people. She, therefore, opened a private school in 1863, doing a higher grade of work than that then undertaken in the public schools. About 1862, however, a colored public school had been opened by a white man named Whitbeck. Miss Richards began to think that she should have such a school herself.

"Miss Hale is a slim, puny silent Virgin…."

By Philip Vickers Fithian

From the Journal and Letters of Philip Vickers Fithian, A Plantation Tutor of the Old Dominion, 1773-1774

Editor's note: the spellings are to period and from Mr. Fithian's diary.

Fryday 24.

La[s]t night we had a Gust of Rain & Thunder; very acceptable—To Day in course Mr. Christians Dance happens here--He came before Breakfast—Miss Jenny Washington came also, & Miss Priscilla Hale while we were at Breakfast