Medicine

Zoobiquity: What Animals Can Teach Us about Health and the Science of Healing by Barbara Natterson-Horowitz

Zoobiquity

Zoobiquity is a nonfiction book written by a heart specialist for humans.  Dr. Barbara Natterson-Horowitz is often called in as a consultant at the Los Angeles Zoo for animals with heart problems.  One day when she was at the zoo, the head veterinarian mentioned a heart condition that vets have known about for decades and yet human doctors only discovered ten years ago. The name was different, but the condition was the same. Zoobiquity is the result of Natterson-Horowitz's efforts to discover what other medical and psychological conditions humans and animal share.

Dr. Natterson-Horowitz begins by explaining that for decades now veterinarians have searched human medical journals for help with their animal patients, but human doctors very seldom consult with veterinarians or read the veterinary medical journals. She began to wonder what else medical doctors have missed by not encouraging an exchange of information. As a heart doctor who is also a psychiatrist, she also began to wonder how many other conditions and psychoses we share with our animal counterparts. 

Critical

By Robin Cook

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Successful doctor and entrepreneur Angela Dawson has a controlling stake in Angels Healthcare, the highly successful medical company she founded. But something unexpected and deeply troubling is happening at her three New York specialty hospitals--drug-resistant staph infections are on the rise, killing patients.
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Going to the Doctor

By T. Berry Brazelton

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A pediatrician tells what happens when a child goes to the doctor for a check-up, with explanations of the instruments and procedures that will be encountered. J618.9 Br

Suggested for ages 4 - 8

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My Doctor

By Harlow Rockwell

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Describes a young child's visit to the doctor's office and has simple pictures of the things in his/her office. JE Fic Roc

Suggested for ages 4 - 8

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Alum Spring Park: A Walk Through History

Alum Spring Park is a 34-acre woodland retreat off Greenbriar Drive with a playground and hiking trails. Its sandstone cliff, also known as the Alum Spring Rock, is 400 feet long and 40 feet high.

Colonial Virginia

What was it like to live long ago when Virginia belonged to England? When there were no cars, no computers, no hospitals and no public schools?

Without cars, trains or airplanes, people traveled by boat, horseback or on foot by "shank's mare". The reason so many colonial towns were located next to rivers is that often the roads were terrible seas of mud. It was so much easier to travel on the rivers!