Roman Empire -- fiction

Where the Wild Rose Blooms

By Lori Wick

Go to catalog
Clayton Taggart is anxious to leave his small Colorado town to begin his training as a teacher when Jackie Fontaine moves into town. Just as the two start to become closer, a secret threatens to tear them apart.
Part of the Rocky Mountain Memories series.
Reserve this title

The Robe

By Lloyd C. Douglas

Go to catalog

A Roman soldier, Marcellus, wins Christ's robe as a gambling prize. He then sets forth on a quest to find the truth about the Nazarene's robe-a quest that reaches to the very roots and heart of Christianity and is set against the vividly limned background of ancient Rome. Here is a timeless story of adventure, faith, and romance, a tale of spiritual longing and ultimate redemption.

 

This best-seller of 1950 was made intothe first movie to be filmed in CinemaScope, starring Richard Burton. Lloyd C. Douglas was a pastor who wrote several best selling novels during the 1940s and 50s.

Reserve this title

The Kingdom of the Wicked

By Anthony Burgess

Go to catalog
"A Roman saga, taking in the excesses of Tiberius, Caligula and Nero and an irreverent account of the early days of Christianity. Sadoc, a dying shipping clerk, sets down for future generations a tale of epic proportions: he is charged with recounting no less an event than the birth of Christianity."
Reserve this title

The Silver Wolf

By Alice Borchardt

Go to catalog

The wars of Charlemagne against declining Rome provide the backdrop to this tale of a female shapeshifter who finds herself a pawn to court intrigue.

Reserve this title

Medicus: A Novel of the Roman Empire, by Ruth Downie

Gaius Petrius Ruso has just arrived for duty in the Britain, a far backwater of the Roman Empire. He’s been assigned to the Valeria Victrix Legion as Medicus, serving the legion and the natives living in the town surrounding the barracks. When the only other doctor on staff is poisoned by a plate of oysters at the local bar/bordello, Ruso works on alone. Tramping the town in an exhausted stupor, he encounters an odious merchant beating an unconscious slave girl—who clearly has a badly broken arm.

Ruso wants to forget he ever saw the girl. He doesn’t have the money to buy her. He has no use for her. But it’s clear that if she stays as she is, she’ll die. So Ruso does buy her, with the plan to heal her and put her to work.  But pretty and clever Tilla has other plans. As a point of honor, she wants to die, and there’s very little Ruso can do about it as she has no plans to tell him.