American Revolution

The Declaration of Independence

By Elaine Landau

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Statistics and facts about the Declaration of Independence.
Updated text presented in a lively, continuous narrative- New center-spread "sidebar" feature presenting material in a fun, creative way- Excellent age-appropriate introduction to curriculum-relevant subjects- "Words to Know" glossary clarifies subject-specific vocabulary- "Learn More" section encourages independent study- Index makes navigating subject matter easy
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The 4th of July Story

By Alice Dalgliesh

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Two-time Newbery Honor author Alice Dalgliesh makes history come alive in this accessible story of America's birthday.
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Give Me Liberty! The Story of the Declaration of Independence

By Russell Freedman

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Describes the events leading up to the Declaration of Independence as well as the personalities and politics behind its framing.

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The First Independence Day Celebration

By Kathy Allen

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In the United States, the Fourth of July means picnics, parades, and fireworks. But it wasn't always so. The First Independence Day happened during a time of war. Here's the story.
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The Shenandoah and Rappahannock Rivers Guide

By Bruce Ingram

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"This book reveals the best angling spots, every rapid and access point, and where the best wildlife and scenery are found. Every chapter begins with an historical anecdote chronicling the fascinating past of the Shenandoah and Rappahannock. Heroes of the Revolutionary and Civil Wars come alive in the tangible setting of these rivers."

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Wellspring of Liberty: How Virginia's Religious Dissenters Helped Win the American Revolution & Secured Religious Liberty

In colonial days, Baptists, Methodists and other dissenters from the Church of England might be jailed for preaching in the streets or fined for keeping their own churches. Evangelical Christians were an important factor in the American Revolution's success.

Flight from Monticello: Thomas Jefferson at War

If your early education taught you something about Thomas Jefferson, it likely included facts on his part in authoring the Declaration of Independence, the Louisiana Purchase, and the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom. Jefferson was an ideas man—a deep thinker. Well-educated in the classics at the College of William and Mary, he stayed out of the usual undergrad troubles by keeping at his studies and socializing with the professors while classmates spent their time drinking, gambling, and racing their horses through the streets. As historian Michael Kranish relates in Flight from Monticello, he made plenty of friends, but they were from the same landed gentry class as himself.

He first encountered an upstart farmer named Patrick Henry at a friend’s dinner party. Jefferson was not impressed by his dress, candid manners or frank speech, which drew a crowd of admirers. Not so much the classical scholar, Patrick Henry was already a practicing attorney while Jefferson was still in school.  While Jefferson carried on learned conversations with his professors, Henry was winning cases—not with references to Greek and Roman scholars but by spelling out the plain merits of the case and the rules of law. Jefferson found his courtroom arguments crude but admired his ability to turn a phrase and set a crowd on fire.

John Paul Jones: A Founder of the U.S. Navy

From a Scottish port to colonial Fredericksburg to the royal courts of France and Russia, the little man who famously refused to give up the fight was perfectly at home in both cottages and elegant salons, but he was always eager to set sail for adventure and glory.

Local Doctor's Hours of Heroism

The time was sunset on Sept. 23, 1779. A full moon was rising. The place was the bloody deck of John Paul Jones’ ship the Bon Homme Richard. There a young Spotsylvanian named Laurence Brooke would show the stuff of which heroes are made.  At age 21, he was the lone surgeon on the Bon Homme Richard as it engaged the 50-gun HMS Serapis in the North Sea off Scarborough, England. The burning Serapis surrendered after a 3 1/2-hour battle during which John Paul Jones proclaimed: “I have not yet begun to fight!”

Martha Washington: An American Life

Patricia Brady

"Martha Custis was an attractive, wealthy widow and the mother of two young children when she agreed to marry again in 1759 and begin a new life as Martha Washington. For the next forty-one years, Martha was not only her husband's beloved partner, but also the absolute mainstay of his increasingly powerful and stressful life. Far from the kindly frump of popular mythology, Brady has discovered a decisive, indomitable woman who contributed greatly to the character of the new country in war and peace." (Book Description)

9780143037132
Adult