Black History Month

Generation Dream 2014 Concert

Generation Dream 2014 Concert

The Generation Dream 2014 Concert has been a much-anticipated annual event for the last eight years in Richmond, and now CRRL is pleased to bring this concert to Fredericksburg for the first time ever! The Generation Dream concerts honor the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. They include live performances that range from a rock band to a classical trio, rap musicians, modern dance, traditional African dance and even to spoken word artists. You can learn more by visiting them on Facebook.

The Fredericksburg concert will be held on Sunday, February 16, from 3:00-4:30 at the Headquarters Library Theater on 1201 Caroline Street. It is sponsored by the Richmond Youth Peace Project, a program of the Richmond Peace Education Center. To sign up, please call 540-372-1144. 

Black History Month Events

Calendar of Local Black History Events  

Ongoing

 

Martin Luther King, Jr.

Exhibit: “All Blood is Red;” examines integration in the context of war and the changing face of America.   More than 70 newly-acquired artifacts and photographs are on display in the special way that our museum juxtaposes the old with the new.  Free and open to the public.   See Web site for hours. John J. Wright Museum; http://jjwmuseum.org/

2/16/2013

Gospelfest, an afternoon of gospel music with choirs, singing groups and praise dance teams in honor of Black History Month; 3 to 4 p.m..; free; co-sponsored by UMW Voices of Praise; George Washington Hall, Dodd Auditorium; University of Mary Washington; (540) 654-1044.

The Forgotten Heroes: The Story of the Buffalo Soldiers

By Clinton Cox

Go to catalog

Recounts the history of the 9th and 10th Cavalry regiments, comprised of African American soldiers recruited to open the West to settlers and whose deeds included escorting wagon trains, carrying mail, and fighting battles against Native Americans.

Reserve this title

Jimi Sounds Like a Rainbow by Gary Golio

Jimi Sounds Like a Rainbow

Jimi Hendrix was an iconic force in rock and roll.  His name is synonymous with music.  In the book Jimi Sounds Like a Rainbow, author Gary Golio introduces us to the young Jimi.  The book begins in 1956 in Seattle, Washington, where Jimi was living with his father.  They were not wealthy, but Jimi's father recognized that his son had a love for music.  Jimi often practiced on his one-string ukele.  With it he recreated the sounds the raindrops made as they hit the roof and the windowpanes.  Even as a very young boy he interpreted the city sounds that he heard outside the boardinghouse where he lived with his Dad and turned them into melodies.