villages -- fiction

03/07/2018 - 12:42am
Cover to The Grave's a Fine and Private Place by C. Alan Bradley

Have you met Flavia de Luce? The girl genius/sleuth, whose adventures began with The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie, finds her young and eventful life in discord after the events of Thrice the Brinded Cat Hath Mew'd. In the latest mystery, The Grave's a Fine and Private Place, Flavia, her family, and her faithful, brilliant, and PTSD-stricken family retainer Dogger, whilst taking a lengthy boating outing complete with picnic hamper, snag something utterly unlike the fish they hoped to enjoy for dinner. No, indeed, their catch is a young man—or, was a young man—dressed in tights and wearing one red silk slipper.

12/19/2017 - 2:21am
Cover to A Christmas Return by Anne Perry

When readers of Anne Perry’s Charlotte & Thomas Pitt mystery series first met Charlotte’s grandmother, Mariah Ellison, in The Cater Street Hangman, she was an embittered shrew. She certainly disapproved of her headstrong granddaughter marrying a mere policeman, an occupation considered quite below her well-heeled family’s Victorian-era standards.

But time and some enlightening experiences, including those events taking place in another year’s Christmas novella (A Christmas Guest), have left Mariah finally coming to terms with the damage done by her extremely regrettable marriage. Alone at Christmas, she feels she is strong enough to make A Christmas Return to right an old wrong that threatens people she cares about very much.

05/02/2017 - 2:28am
Cover to The Summer Before the War by Helen Simonson

2017 falls during the 100th anniversary of World War I, and The Summer Before the War is the perfect novel to remind us of the world-changing conflict’s impact. In the novel, England is in the midst of fighting the Great War. For the small town of Rye in Sussex, all of the moral complexities of that war are realized. Helen Simonson is a master of gentle and sometimes fierce satire in this comedy of manners, as she was in her first novel, Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand.

The first three parts of The Summer Before the War have a lighter tone as the characters are gently satirized for their foibles. There is nostalgia for the Edwardian innocence still left in the town of Rye, but cruel prejudice and gossip also reside in the town. All the characters seem like good people, but Helen Simonson cleverly reveals their flaws. Beatrice Nash enters the scene as the first female Latin “master” for the local grammar school. Beatrice has recently lost her father, whom she idolized, but she will not bow to the dictates and restrictions of how her family and society want her to lead her life, so she must earn her way.

01/06/2016 - 12:08am
Death of a Charming Man by M. C. Beaton

Hamish Macbeth, lay-about but ultimately effective policeman of the Scottish village of Strathbane, believed that he was very close to achieving his heart’s desire. The cool and lovely Priscilla had agreed to be his bride!

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