Infectious diseases -- fiction

07/28/2017 - 8:37am
If you like The Strain series by Guillermo del Toro

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The Strain by Guillermo del Toro
Abraham Setrakian, a former professor and survivor of the Holocaust, joins forces with CDC specialist Eph Goodweather to battle a vampiric virus that has infected New York in this first installment in a thrilling trilogy about a horrifying battle between man and vampire that threatens all humanity. (catalog summary)

The other two books in the trilogy include . . .The Fall (#2) and The Night Eternal (#3).

The FallThe Night Eternal


The Strain TV Show 

The Strain is an American horror drama television series that premiered on FX on July 13, 2014. It was created by Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan. Carlton Cuse serves as executive producer and showrunner. Del Toro and Hogan wrote the pilot episode, "Night Zero", which del Toro directed. A thirteen-episode first season was ordered on November 19, 2013. On August 6, 2014, FX renewed The Strain for a 13-episode second season which premiered on July 12, 2015. [In] 2015, FX renewed The Strain for a 10-episode third season which premiered on August 28, 2016. FX renewed the series for a fourth and final season, which is scheduled to premiere on July 16, 2017.¹
 

06/14/2016 - 2:49am
Cover to The Fireman: A Novel by Joe Hill

They call it “Draco Incendia Trychophyton,” or Dragonscale. It’s a disease—a perpetual plague—that is wiping out the world with its intricate black and gold tattoos scrawled across its chosen, ill-fated bodies. At first, its carriers believe it to be harmless, maybe even a beautiful illness.

But then, your body bursts into flames. Spontaneous combustion is now a real thing.

07/22/2015 - 1:47pm
The Great Trouble: A Mystery of London, the Blue Death, and a Boy Called Eel by

Eel’s early morning spent scavenging on the Thames River as a “mud-lark” brought a few things to the surface. There was a nice piece of copper, but he had to give that over to one of the stronger mud-larkers, a kindly blacksmith turned to this low way of making a living. But he did come away with two valuable things—or at least valuable to him. One was a half-drowned cat, thrown into the river by a bully boy. The other was a word of warning from the old blacksmith. Fish-Eye Bill was looking for him again, he said. A year Eel had spent in an easier life, getting his schooling, working two jobs and staying away from places he might be seen by Bill’s crew. It sounded like the makings for serious danger. Though in Deborah Hopkinson’s The Great Trouble, Eel’s problems are only beginning.

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