Paris (France) -- fiction

The Invention of Hugo Cabret: A Novel in words and pictures

By Brian Selznick

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When Hugo, an orphan living and repairing clocks within the walls of a Paris train station in 1931, meets a mysterious toy seller and his goddaughter, his undercover life and his biggest secret are jeopardized. Made into the feature film, Hugo.

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Gatekeeper

By Philip Shelby

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Paris-based U.S. Foreign Service Officer Hollis Fremont is unwittingly responsible for sneaking a hired assassin into America. Dashing Sam Crawford the gatekeeper of the title, comes to her rescue, helping her chase down the killer before he strikes.

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Giovanni's Room

By James Baldwin

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"Set in the 1950s Paris of American expatriates, liaisons, and violence, a young man finds himself caught between desire and conventional morality. With a sharp, probing imagination, James Baldwin's now-classic narrative delves into the mystery of loving and creates a moving, highly controversial story of death and passion that reveals the unspoken complexities of the human heart."
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Revolution by Jennifer Donnelly

Revolution Jennifer Donnelly

Revolution, by Jennifer Donnelly, spans both time and social status. In the present there is Andi, a musical prodigy who is about to get kicked out of her prestigious New York City school. She’s mad at her father for the divorce and at her mother for retreating into her own private shell. But mostly she’s in pain over the death of her younger brother, for which she blames herself.

In the past there’s Alexandrine, living through the bloody days of the French Revolution. Alex is a struggling actor who serves as nanny to Louis-Charles, the lost prince of France, and an unwilling spy for Duc d’Orleans.

The Werewolf of Paris

By Guy Endore

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This horrific tale, set against the backdrop of the bloody Franco-Prussian War in the 1840s, pulls no punches as it delves into the heart of the beast and begs the question, what is the nature of true evil. A classic of its kind, in many ways comparable to Stoker's Dracula.

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Lydia Cassatt Reading the Morning Paper

By Harriet Scott Chessman

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Set in the Parisian art world of the 1880s, this novel imagines a poignant time in the lives of the American impressionist Mary Cassatt and her sister, Lydia. Fatally ill and conscious of impending death, Lydia contemplates her narrowing world.
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