Northern Neck

Accommodating Revolutions: Virginia’s Northern Neck in an Era of Transformations, 1760-1810

By Albert H. Tillson, Jr.

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The Northern Neck runs from Falmouth in Stafford County all the way down to Windmill Point in Lancaster County, bounded by the Rappahannock River to the south and the Potomac River to the north.  Now it’s a sleepy section of Virginia but it was once called the Athens of the New World.

What a foreign world it seems to us today—the antebellum Northern Neck--where wealthy white plantation owners bought and sold slaves with ease along with the services of bound whites for years at a time. How could such a system that relied on keeping people in their places and maintaining the established order bring forth some of the greatest leaders of the Revolutionary period? History is complicated, and Accommodating Revolutions digs into court documents and newspaper accounts to flesh out what was going on with those who served the gentry as the winds of political and religious upheaval shook Virginia.
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Accommodating Revolutions: Virginia’s Northern Neck in an Era of Transformations, 1760-1810 by Albert H. Tillson, Jr.

The Northern Neck runs from Falmouth in Stafford County all the way down to Windmill Point in Lancaster County, bounded by the Rappahannock River to the south and the Potomac River to the north.  Now it’s a sleepy section of Virginia but it was once called the Athens of the New World.

Virginia's Northern Neck: A Pictorial History

By John C. Wilson

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Virginia's Northern Neck: A Pictorial History is filled with photos and illustrations that, along with informative text, give an lively dimension to the region's past, from early settlements to steamboat days to 20th-century lives well-lived.

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John Alexander: A Northern Neck Proprietor, His Family, Friends and Kin

By Wesley E. Pippenger

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John Alexander, who immigrated to Virginia circa 1653, had vast land holdings in the Neck and numerous descendants. This volume examines the family history through much of the 19th century.
Includes many reproductions of photographs and historic papers as well as an index to dozens of other families mentioned.
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The Ghosts of Virginia, Volume IV

By L. B. Taylor, Jr.

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Ghost tales and folklore from Northern Virginia, the Shenandoah Valley, Richmond and Central Virginia, Roanoke and Central Virginia, Southside Virginia, Tidewater Virginia, Fredericksburg and the Northern Neck. Part of a popular series by the same author.
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Alvin, Recollections and Reflections

By John Harding, Jr.

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Though listed in our catalog as fiction, this biography interweaves much truth in its retelling of the life of Alvin "Stack" Wormley, an actual person born in 1912 in the Northen Neck. He worked as a farmer, fisherman, oysterman, in a canning factory and fought in World War II. The author knew and liked this man and set down some of his many conversations with him. After Alvin Wormley's death, John Harding, Jr. interviewed his friends and relatives to better tell the tale of an upstanding, uncommon man.
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The Lees of Virginia, Seven Generations of an American Family

By Paul C. Nagel

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"There are few American families that feature such a collection of characters, both heroic and ignoble, who have made such a mark on history as the Lees. In The Lees of Virginia, Paul Nagel chronicles seven generations of Lees, covering over two hundred years of accolades and scandals. We meet Thomas Lee, who dreamed of America as a continental empire, and his son, Arthur Lee, who created a political storm with his accusations against Benjamin Franklin. Arthur's cousin was Light-Horse Harry Lee, a controversial cavalry officer in the Revolutionary War, whose wild real estate speculation led to imprisonment for debt and finally self-exile in the Caribbean. One of Harry's sons, Henry Lee, further disgraced the family by seducing his sister-in-law and frittering away Stratford, the Lees' ancestral home. It was a third son, Robert E. Lee, who would become the family's redeeming figure, a brilliant tactician still revered for his lofty character and military success. In these and numerous other portraits, Nagel discloses how, from 1640 to 1870, a family spirit united the Lees, making them a force in Virginian and American affairs."
(From the publisher's description)

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Irons in the Fire: The Business History of the Tayloe Family and Virginia's Gentry, 1700-1860

By Laura Croghan Kamoie

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Irons in the Fire chronicles the agricultural, industrial, and commercial activities of four generations of the Tayloe family of Northern Virginia, revealing a greater complexity in the southern business culture of early America than scholars have generally recognized. Through the story of one representative family, Laura Croghan Kamoie illustrates how entrepreneurship and a broadly skilled slave-labor force combined to create economic diversification well before the American Revolution. Contrary to general historical perceptions, southern elite planters were, at least until the 1790s, very like their northern counterparts.
(From the publisher's description)

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Speaking of the Northern Neck of Virginia & Life in Its Long-Untrodden Ways During Three and a Half Centuries

By C. Jackson Simmons

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This is a compilation of speeches by a noted Northern Neck historian, augmented by many illustrations. The subjects include the Northern Neck's early settlement, speech patterns of the gentry and others, the "villaines" Moll Flanders and Henry Esmond, crime & punishments generally, a colonial church,
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