1950s

The Dark Age of Animation

Scooby-do

From the mid-1950s to the late 1980s, the world of animation in the United States experienced a severe quality drought. Television animation was cheaply and quickly produced and loaded with errors. Feature-length animation experienced severe budget cuts, and the number of animated movies being released was drastically reduced. Cartoons that many generations grew up watching were made with “limited animation”—a style that utilized as few frames as possible, which resulted in choppy, simplified character motions.

Fight on! Mary Church Terrell's Battle for Integration

By Dennis Brindell Fradin & Judith Bloom Fradin

Go to catalog

Profiles the first black Washington, D.C. Board of Education member, who helped to found the NAACP and organized of pickets and boycotts that led to the 1953 Supreme Court decision to integrate D.C. area restaurants.

Reserve this title

Native Dancer, the Grey Ghost: Hero of a Golden Age

By John Eisenberg

Go to catalog

Great race horses are not supposed to be gray. The lighter the coat color, the lighter the color of the hooves. Lighter hooves were traditionally believed to be weaker and less able to withstand the stresses of hard racing. In the 1950s, however, there was a gray champion who liked to come in fast from far behind. Big and powerful, Native Dancer was named Horse of the Year in 1954 and graced the cover of Time magazine.

Reserve this title

A Celtic Childhood

By Bill Watkins

Go to catalog

"A Celtic Childhood is the lyrical narrative of a gifted and animated storyteller. With humor and charm, Watkins blends history, song, and Celtic identity into a wonderful tale of misadventure and merriment. With this collection of colorful characters and humorous memories, a lucid picture of one man's history and identity is shaped. When asked how memory played a role--or played tricks--in writing his book, Watkins replied, 'When you're young you're like blottin' paper and you soak everything up. Sitting around the kitchen table, I heard these same stories and songs over and over again. Of course, part of the Celtic psyche is the ability to have memories that you've never had.'"

Reserve this title

Cary Grant: The Biography

By Marc Eliot

Go to catalog

Rigorously researched and elegantly written, Cary Grant: A Biography is a complete, nuanced portrait of the greatest star in cinema history. Exploring Grant’s troubled childhood, ambiguous sexuality, and lifelong insecurities, as well as the magical amalgam of characteristics that allowed him to remain Hollywood’s favorite romantic lead for more than thirty-five years, Cary Grant is the definitive examination of every aspect of Grant’s professional and private life and the first biography to reveal the real man behind the movie star.

Reserve this title

The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid: A Memoir

By Bill Bryson

Go to catalog

"Bill Bryson was born in the middle of the American century--1951--in the middle of the United States--Des Moines, Iowa--in the middle of the largest generation in American history--the baby boomers. Like millions of his generational peers, Bill Bryson grew up with a rich fantasy life as a superhero. Using his fantasy-life persona as a springboard, Bryson re-creates the life of his family in the 1950s in all its transcendent normality--a life at once familiar to us all and as far away and unreachable as another galaxy."

Also available in large print and on audio.

Reserve this title

Once Upon a Time When We Were Colored

By Clifton L. Taulbert

Go to catalog

Clifton Taulbert's loving memoir of life in the colored section of a little Mississippi Delta town has won praise and stirred hearts across the nation, and was turned into a moving and memorable film.

Reserve this title

Love, Lucy

By Lucille Ball

Go to catalog

Lucille Ball wrote this book in the years leading up to 1964 and put it aside to avoid hurting Desi Arnaz. How fortunate we are that it has been found and published. It describes the many years of hard work that it took for her to become the star that we knew.

Reserve this title

Classics in the Afternoon: Hitchcock's Vertigo

Vertigo movie poster

Come join the England Run branch of the Central Rappahannock Regional Library for Alfred Hitchcock's classic 1958 thriller Vertigo starring James Stewart and Kim Novak on Thursday, August 11th at 2:00pm.

A San Francisco detective suffering from acrophobia investigates the strange activities of an old friend's wife, all the while becoming dangerously obsessed with her.

Sisters in the Struggle: African American Women in the Civil Rights--Black Power Movement

By Bettye Collier-Thomas and V.P. Franklin, editors

Go to catalog
"Women were at the forefront of the civil rights struggle, but their indvidiual stories were rarely heard. Only recently have historians begun to recognize the central role women played in the battle for racial equality. In Sisters in the Struggle, we hear about the unsung heroes of the civil rights movements such as Ella Baker, who helped found the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, Fannie Lou Hamer, a sharecropper who took on segregation in the Democratic party (and won), and Septima Clark, who created a network of 'Citizenship Schools' to teach poor Black men and women to read and write and help them to register to vote.

"We learn of Black women's activism in the Black Panther Party where they fought the police, as well as the entrenched male leadership, and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, where the behind-the-scenes work of women kept the organization afloat when it was under siege. It also includes first-person testimonials from the women who made headlines with their courageous resistance to segregation--Rosa Parks, Charlayne Hunter-Gault, and Dorothy Height."

Reserve this title