Tickle Your Funnybone

Victor Hugo said that "Laughter is the sun that drives winter from the human face." Try one of these titles to see if Hugo was right. Happy reading!

Wilbur Winkle Has a Complaint

By Wilbur Winkle

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"Wilbur Winkle, an idiosyncratic nebbish with a peculiar focus on the odd and unlikely fact, has corresponded for years with America's major corporations. Fueling his complaints and comments is a single overriding premise: that the rights of consumers - his rights - are under siege, and he must do what he can to defend them."

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The Party, After You Left

By Roz Chast

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"...brings together the last nine years of cartoons from Roz Chast. Together these drawings, which originally appeared in the New Yorker, Scientific American, Redbook, and other publications, constitute a spot-on record of our increasingly absurd existence. As the twenty-first century begins, we can only be grateful that Roz Chast is here to tackle some of the tough themes of the times: genetically altered mice, birthday parties from hell, and comfort drinks in the age of insecurity."

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The Illustrated Woody Allen Reader

By Woody Allen

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Selections from published and never-before-published works are collected in a work that features film excerpts, one-liners, essays, stand-up routines, Allen's classic New Yorker pieces, screenplays, film outtakes, magazine articles, and interviews.

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The Bear in the Attic

By Patrick F. McManus

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"...he ponders the strange allure of the RV, a thirtieth-century hunting trip, the art of wrestling toads, the existential implications of being lost, the baffling tendency of animals to outsmart those who wish to hunt them, the singular pleasure of doubling the size of every fish one doesn't catch, and what happens when a bear named Pooky decides to hibernate in the attic. Combining the curmudgeonly tone of Dave Barry and the clever insights of Garrison Keillor with his own keen sense of the absurd, McManus brilliantly captures the funny and strange in our everyday existence."
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Planet Idiot: A Survival Guide

By Lindsey Stokes

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"Midway through writing this, her first book, ...Lindsey Stokes faced a dilemma. She realized that there's already so much pain and suffering in life--diseases, hunger, underwire brassieres, folks who flash their headlights at you when you're driving too slowly--that she didn't want to add more. She worried that the world might not be ready for the awful truth: namely, that it is full of idiots."

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The Most of P.G. Wodehouse

By P.G. Wodehouse

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"The most lavish P. G. Wodehouse collection ever published. In addition to Wodehouse's best known and beloved Jeeves and Bertie stories, The Most of P. G. Wodehouse features delightful stories about The Drones Club and its affable, vacuous members: Mr. Mulliner, whose considered judgment on any and all topics is drawn from the experiences of his innumerable relatives; Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge, the man of gilt-edged schemes; and Lord Emsworth, ruler of all he surveys at Blanding's Castle. Rounding out the collection are Wodehouses's witty golf stories and a complete and completely hilarious novel, Quick Service. As Jeeves would say, 'The mind boggles, sir.'"
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My World and Welcome to It

By James Thurber

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"James Thurber reported the world as he saw it. But what a world! Only Thurber could picture a seal peering nearsightedly over a headboard or a former husband crouched atop the armoire. Titles in this selection, all vintage Thurber, hint at the range of his whimsy and include 'Courtship Through the Ages,' 'The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,' 'Interview with a Lemming' and 'You Know How the French Are.'"-

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Mirth of a Nation: The Best Contemporary Humor

By Michael J. Rosen, editor

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"...a premier showcase of fifty-four great literary humorists and masters of the journalistic jab, the social spoof, the parodic proof, the satire, the tirade, and the send-up. Here are those 'last laughs' and 'wit's end' pieces everyone turns to first but then loses in back issues of favorite magazines and newspapers, including: Merrill Markoe on Networking with Angels, Garry Trudeau on re-retranslating Madonna, David Sedaris on reviewing school Christmas Plays, and John Updike on cross-dressing with J. Edgar Hoover. Also included are riotous contributions from Henry Alford, Jon Stewart, and David Ives, as well as millennial maxims by Mark O'Donnell, gardening advice by Mertensia Corydalis, and highlights from Randy Cohen's savvy 'News Quiz.'"
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Letters from a Nut

By Jerry Seinfeld

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Jerry Seinfeld created an alter ego (Ted L. Nancy) who writes letters of suggestions or strange requests to companies all over America. The letters he writes are funny and the (mostly) straight responses top off the joke!

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Furry Logic: A Guide to Life's Little Challenges

By Jane Seabrook

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"Animals caught up in the joy and drudgery of life are paired with old adages given a new spin for our times."
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