Imagination -- fiction

How to Bicycle to the Moon to Plant Sunflowers: A Simple but Brilliant Plan in 24 Easy Steps by Mordicai Gerstein

How to Bicycle to the Moon to Plant Sunflowers: A Simple but Brilliant Plan in 2

Plant sunflowers on the Moon? What a great idea! Now, how can we get there? Why, a bicycle of course!

Have you ever looked at the Moon and thought it looked sad? It’s all by its lonesome and nothing lives there. For one young boy his sole mission is to cheer up the Moon. How does he plan to cheer up the moon? By planting sunflowers! In the picture book How to Bicycle to the Moon to Plant Sunflowers: A Simple but Brilliant Plan in 24 Easy Steps, author Mordicai Gerstein has laid out a plan for anyone to follow to reach the Moon. NASA hasn’t even thought of it! All you will need is a bicycle, a huge slingshot, an extremely long garden hose, and a spacesuit, size extra small, from NASA. Sounds easy, right? Have you gotten permission from your parents? Uh, oh, that could be the most difficult part of this brilliant plan.

My New Teacher and Me! by Al Yankovic

My New Teacher and Me! by Al Yankovic

Getting ready for back-to-school, but not ready to pack away the fun? Al Yankovic’s My New Teacher and Me! is as welcome for the last weeks of summer as an ice cream truck after a long, hot day at the pool.  In this rollicking story, Mr. Booth’s strict rules have met their match in Billy, a bright-eyed boy who shows up for the first day of class with a wide-open imagination. Disapproving Mr. Booth spots the dirt on Billy’s shirt immediately! Billy quickly—and politely—tells him how that came to be:

“I was digging to China out in my backyard.

And I almost was there when—I hit something hard!

Well, I dug, and I dug, and I dug a bit more

And discovered the skull of a real dinosaur!

“And I would have cleaned up, sir, but hey, I’m no fool—

I just couldn’t be late on the first day of school!”

Bow-tied and sour, Mr. Booth says his tale sounds highly unlikely, but as Billy points out, “the awesome-est things in the world often are!”

Wishworks, Inc.

By Stephanie S. Tolan

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If wishes were dogs, every kid would have one . . . but when Max asks for a dog from Wishworks, Inc., he gets more than he expected! Max is handling his parents' divorce, his new home and school, and a big bully named Nick the only way he knows how: by running away. In his mind, he and his beautiful dog King have thrilling adventures in the woods; they conquer aliens and slay dragons; they embarrass Nick so he never comes near Max again. Then Max happens upon a store called Wishworks, Inc., which promises his wish will come true in real life, "guaranteed." He wishes for a real dog to fulfill all his dreams. And then a real dog named Goldie appears on his doorstep . . . but she may be a little more real than Max expects!

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The Queen of France

By Tim Wadham

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Rose wakes up one morning feeling royal and, donning jewels and a crown, she seeks her parents who behave as her royal subjects, causing Rose to wonder what they would think if the queen traded places with their daughter.
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My Garden

By Kevin Henkes

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After helping her mother weed, water, and chase the rabbits from their garden, a young girl imagines her dream garden complete with jellybean bushes, chocolate rabbits, and tomatoes the size of beach balls.
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The Chalkbox Kid

By Clyde Robert Bulla

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Nine-year-old Gregory's house does not have room for a garden, but he creates a surprising and very different garden in an unusual place. Suggested for ages 7-9.
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Changing Planes

By Ursula K. Le Guin

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"Missing a flight, waiting in an airport, listening to garbled announcements - who doesn't hate that misery? But Sita Dulip from Cincinnati finds a method of bypassing the crowds at the desks, the long lines at the toilets, the nasty lunch, the whimpering children and punitive parents, the bookless bookstores, and the blue plastic chairs bolted to the floor. A mere kind of twist and a slipping bend, easier to do than to describe, takes her not to Denver but to Strupsirts, a picturesque region of waterspouts and volcanoes, or to Djeyo where she can stay for two nights in a small hotel with a balcony overlooking the amber Sea of Somue.

"This new discovery - changing planes - enables Sita to visit bizarre societies and cultures that sometimes mirror our own and sometimes open doors into the alien."

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Harold and the Purple Crayon

By Crockett Johnson

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One evening Harold decided to go for a walk in the moonlight. But there wasn't any moon, and Harold needed a moon for a walk in the moonlight. Fortunately, he had brought his purple crayon. So he drew a moon. He also needed something to walk on. So he drew a path...

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