Email -- fiction

A Woman's Place

By Linda Grant

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"When private investigator Catherine Sayler is called in by the Systech corporation to find out who's sending lewd messages through the company's E-mail, the case seems merely routine. The situation changes for the worse when female employees start receiving photographs of women being tortured.

"But those incidents seem like childish pranks compared to Catherine's next discovery: a brutal murder. When the perverted killer begins to stalk Catherine with his twisted games, she finds it will take all her strength and intelligence to meet the inevitable confrontation. And only one of them will survive...."

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The Boy Next Door

By Meg Cabot

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In her first adult novel since her successful series, The Princess Diaries, Meg Cabot uses her heroine's e-mails to tell this boy-meets-girl story. Gossip columnist Melissa Fuller, always chronically late for work, has a real excuse for not showing up to work on time when her elderly neighbor is attacked and put in the hospital, leaving Mel in charge of two cats, a great Dane and her playboy nephew Max. But there is something mysterious about Max and then the killer returns...

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Letters from Cleo and Tyrone: A Feline Perspective on Love, Life, and Litter

By L. Virginia Browne

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Cleo and Tyrone, two cats, take time between naps and feline mayhem to e-mail each other and share their views on catnip fields, fashion, poetry, tummy rubs, fashion and their owners.

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E, a Novel

By Matt Beaumont

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Backstabbing, office politics, and corporate intrigue in an advertising agency vying for the almighty Coca-Cola account. E-mails fly with sexual innuendoes, sly insults, and downright lies as the employees claw their way up and down the corporate ladder.

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Disobedience

By Jane Hamilton

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"Reading someone else's e-mail is a quiet, clean enterprise. There is no pitterpattering around the room, no opening and closing the desk drawers, no percussive creasing as you draw the paper from the envelope and unfold it. There is no sound but the melody of dial-up, the purity of the following Gregorian tones, and the sweet nihilistic measure of static."

Teenager Henry reads his mother's e-mail and shakes the foundations of his family.

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Dear Stranger, Dearest Friend

By Laney Katz Becker

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Two very different women meet in a chat room about breast cancer. Their e-mails form a friendship and bond as they learn to laugh and cry together about the absurdities, pain, and most of all, the love that life can bring.
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