Fredericksburg (Va.)

Bird's Eye View of Fredericksburg: Its History

By Jane Kosa, CRRL Staff

From the Central Rappahannock Regional Library

Fredericksburg

The Face of Virginia: A Pictorial Study by A. Aubrey Bodine.
There is no panoramic map of Fredericksburg, however, there are six local entries: Kenmore, Mary Washington College, Marye's Heights, the Masonic Lodge, the Hugh Mercer Apothecary, and the James Monroe Law Office.

Guide to the Battles of Chancellorsville & Fredericksburg

By Jay Luvaas and Harold W. Nelson, editors

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Eyewitness accounts by battle participants make these guides an invaluable resource for travelers and nontravelers who want a greater understanding of five of the most devastating yet influential years in our nation's history. Explicit directions to points of interest and maps--illustrating the action and showing the detail of troop position, roads, rivers, elevations, and tree lines as they were 130 years ago--help bring the battles to life. In the field, these guides can be used to recreate each battle's setting and proportions, giving the reader a sense of the tension and fear each soldier must have felt as he faced his enemy.
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This book is part of the U.S. Army War College Guides to Civil War Battles series.

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History of Fredericksburg, Virginia

By Alvin T. Embrey

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This history of the town was first published in 1937.

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A Slave No More: Two Men Who Escaped to Freedom: Including Their Own Narratives of Emancipation

By David W. Blight, editor

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Through a combination of intelligence, daring, and sheer luck, the men reached the protection of occupying Union troops. Historian Blight prefaces the narratives with each man's life history. Using genealogical information, Blight has reconstructed their childhoods as sons of white slaveholders, their service as cooks and camp hands during the Civil War, and their climb to black working-class stability in the North, where they reunited their families. In the stories of Wallace Turnage and John Washington, we find portals that offer a rich new answer to the question of how four million people moved from slavery to freedom.
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John Washington's Civil War: A Slave Narrative

By Crandall Shifflett, editor

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John Washington's recounting of his difficult years as a Virginia slave was made only seven years after his emancipation.

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Historic Churches of Fredericksburg: Houses of the Holy

By Michael Aubrecht

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Recalls stories of rebellion, racism and reconstruction as experienced by Secessionists, Unionists and the African American population in Fredericksburg's landmark churches during the Civil War and Reconstruction eras.
Using a wide variety of materials compiled from the local National Park archives, author Michael Aubrecht presents multiple perspectives from local believers and nonbelievers who witnessed the country's "Great Divide." Learn about the importance of faith in old Fredericksburg through the recollections of local clergy such as Reverend Tucker Lacy; excerpts from slave narratives as recorded by Joseph F. Walker; impressions of military commanders such as Robert E. Lee and "Stonewall" Jackson; and stories of the conflict over African-American membership.
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Virginia Horse Racing: Triumphs of the Turf

By Virginia C. Johnson and Barbara Crookshanks

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Virginia, mother of presidents, is also the mother of American horse racing. From the very beginning, Virginians have risked it all on the track as eagerly as on the battlefield. Follow the bloodlines of three foundation sires of the American Thoroughbred through generations of rollicking races and larger-than-life grandees wagering kingly stakes, sometimes on horses not yet born.
From the publisher's description.

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Fredericksburg, Virginia: Eclectic Histories for the Curious Reader

By Ted Kamieniak

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People who visit Fredericksburg can be entranced with its sometimes quirky ways and people. This volume tells tales not oft repeated from the city's and its surroundings' past.
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Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania Court House

By John F. Cummings III

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Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania County both witnessed the ravages of America's defining drama. This is the story of a town forced into exodus by the harsh hand of war and of the strength that helped its residents find rebirth from the ashes of destruction. This shared experience would bring people like John Henry Myer and Joseph Walker into a united community, despite diverse backgrounds and racial differences. Fredericksburg had enjoyed prosperity as a colonial-era tobacco port, but economic and agricultural changes diminished this importance.
By the 1850s, Fredericksburg had been eclipsed by Richmond to the south and Alexandria to the north. Shortly before the Civil War, a small industrial boom revitalized the town only to be cast asunder by the events of 1861-1865. Ten miles south is Spotsylvania Court House, the county seat. Here too, fate would deal a blow as warring armies raged over the pastoral setting, leaving destruction in their wake.
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Forgotten Companions: The First Settlers of Spotsylvania County and Fredericksburgh town (with Notes on Early Land Use)

By Paula S. Felder

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An examination of the earliest days of Spotsylvania and Fredericksburg with a special emphasis on land acquisitions.

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