Fredericksburg (Va.)

10/28/2009 - 3:41pm

Vanilla Drops

This is the recipe I always use. Good.

Cream 1/2 cup butter and 2 cups sugar, add 2 eggs well beaten, 3/4 cup cold water, 2 heaping teaspoonfuls yeast powder, enough flour to make a stiff batter. Flavor with vanilla. Drop on well greased pans and bake in a moderately quick oven.*
This takes about 1 pt flour.

*about 375º

This recipe comes from a fascinating little book, Annie Flora Myer, Confederate Daughter of Fredericksburg: Recipes and Remedies in Her Own Hand, edited by her great grandniece Anne Ligon. It is available for reserve and check out through the Central Rappahannock Regional Library.

10/19/2009 - 1:10pm

By Anonymous

Town Topics of May 1 says: Miss Marion Murchison, who last week married the young southerner, "Charlie" Hurkamp, wore one of the most exquisite bridal gowns that has been seen this season. It was composed entirely of point lace over chiffon, and had a long rounded train over which fell the bridal veil, also of point lace. The effect would have been too heavy and stiff for anybody but a girl of Miss Murchison's slight graceful figure. As it was, she made a most attractive picture in the costume. The veil was fastened to her dark hair by carelessly arranged gardenias, which also formed the bridal bouquet. The wedding took place at the Murchison residence, on Fifty-seventh street [New York City], about fifty guests being present.

09/03/2009 - 11:28am

By Francis J. Brooke

Macfarlane & Fergusson Printers, Richmond, Va. 1849

Reprinted in The Magazine of History with Notes and Queries

Published by William Abbatt, 1921 Extra Number--No. 74

EDITOR'S PREFACE.

OUR first item is an unusual one—a family memoir, written by a father for his children and issued as a private publication, in a very small edition: so small that its existence is almost unknown, but one copy being recorded as sold, in many years.

The author was a distinguished lawyer and judge of Virginia, who had joined Washington's army at sixteen, and after the Revolution held various judicial offices, including that of judge of the Court of Appeals, which he held for forty years.

08/10/2015 - 10:25am
Marketing

We were recently interviewed for possible inclusion in a book about word-of-mouth-marketing.  The authors are intrigued with how we market our library services and resources not just to our patrons, but also to our funding organizations, other libraries, and other organizations.  For example, staff have used free software programs to create a video entitled "Who Needs the Public Library?," which you can view on YouTube in our crrlvideo "channel."

10/28/2009 - 3:17pm

This article was first printed in the January, 1979 issue of the Fredericksburg Times magazine and appears here with the author's permission. Hazel Hill no longer stands.

The old Fredericksburg home, Hazel Hill, was built about 1793 by John Minor (1761-1816) at the time of his marriage (his second) to Lucy Landon Carter. It remained the Minor home until about 1855 after which its ownership passed through several hands including Montgomery Slaughter (Fredericksburg Mayor, 1860-1868) and Judge Henry Souther. It was the latter who, in the spring of 1890, sold Hazel Hill to the Honorable Joseph S. Potter.
Mr. Potter was a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives from 1866 to 1871 and the Senate from 1871 to 1874. He was appointed to a high government office in Germany where he served until April, 1890 at which time he moved to Fredericksburg. He was described as a man who could spread sunshine among people; who could make two blades of grass grow whe= re none had grown before!

09/29/2014 - 4:16pm

Fredericksburg's Mary Ball Washington was an intrepid 18th-century woman who raised five children alone. The oldest became the first President of the United States.

Mary Washington's name and heritage are alive and well in the Fredericksburg area and beyond. Her home is at the corner of Lewis and Charles streets; the Mary Washington Monument is on Washington Avenue, which was originally Mary Washington Avenue.

10/28/2009 - 2:02pm

Archaeologist Roy Butler explores the historical significance of this early street, believed to have been named for Sophia Dorothea, sister of George II and mother of Frederick the Great of Prussia.

When we think of Fredericksburg history as it relates to Sophia Street, we immediately bring to mind a few specific remaining structures and sites as we see them today: The Toll House at the foot of Rocky Lane; the present Half Way house at Wolfe and Sophia Streets, once an early tavern. The Center for the Creative Arts, referred to as the Silversmith's House; and the Sandstone Warehouse at the bridge at Sophia and William Streets.

10/28/2009 - 3:13pm

Beginning a three-month tour of the Southern states in April of 1791, President George Washington came, unannounced, to Fredericksburg from Mt. Vernon.

Without delay, all forces were organized and an elegant dinner was prepared at Fredericksburg's Market-House/Town Hall to honor the hometown boy. The principal inhabitants of the corporation amassed at the brick building at the west side of Caroline Street, just below Market Alley.

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