Fredericksburg (Va.)

Walk Through History...Washington Avenue

By The Fredericksburg Area Tourism Department

WASHINGTON AVENUE WEST

 

1200 - Built in 1916/ 1917 for Victor & M.C. Moon, traveling salesman. Architect, Philip Stern. Brick, showing modern and oriental infuence, quality work with early tile roof and copper drains.

A Discussion of Black History in the Development of Fredericksburg

From the Central Rappahannock Regional Library

Black Businesses and Services, Rappahannock Area compiled by Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., Xi Upsilon Omega chapter.
Copyright 1997.

Fredericksburg in the 50s

By Sue Willis, CRRL Staff

From the Central Rappahannock Regional Library

Coping with Jim Crow: Black Education in Fredericksburg by Constance Greer O'Brion.
Education and segregation in Fredericksburg from the 40's to the 70's.

A Different Story: A Black History of Fredericksburg, Stafford, and Spotsylvania, Virginia by Ruth Coder Fitzgerald.
Ms. Fitzgerald traces the area's black history from the colonial days to the 1970s. Includes photos of community leaders, past and present. Of particular interest are the following chapters: Moving into the Mainstream by the Reverend Lawrence Davies and "Let Him Speak" by Dr. Philip Y. Wyatt.

The Royal Griffin: Frederick Prince of Wales

By John Walters

Go to catalog

A complete biography of Frederick, for whom Fredericksburg was named.

Reserve this title

Coffee Houses: A Tradition Dating to Colonial Times

With steaming cups in hand, today's Fredericksburg area coffee shops continue a tradition which dates back three centuries to the founding of the town.

Walk in gentlemen, rest at your ease,
Pay for what you call for, and call for what you please.

This verse hung over the doorway of The Coffee House in colonial Fredericksburg.  Read on for details of the Old Town's revolutionary brew of politics and polite society.

Coffee Houses: A Tradition Dating to Colonial Times

With steaming cups in hand, today's Fredericksburg area coffee shops continue a tradition which dates back three centuries to the founding of the town.

Walk in gentlemen, rest at your ease,
Pay for what you call for, and call for what you please.

This verse hung over the doorway of The Coffee House in old Fredericksburg. Located in the first Market House/Town Hall on Caroline Street near William, it was here that 18th- and 19th-century Fredericksburgers sipped their favorite brew and pondered questions from the political to the classical.

Fredericksburg

By De'Onne C. Scott

Go to catalog

The author drew on her local knowledge and extensive collection of postcards to give a lively and unique view of the city's past.

Reserve this title

Fielding Lewis and the Washington Family: A Chronicle of 18th-Century Fredericksburg

By Paula S. Felder

Go to catalog

Local historian Paula Felder has researched the Lewis and Washington connections thoroughly and gives an interesting yet scholarly introduction to Kenmore's first family and its more famous relations.

Reserve this title

Brady's Civil War

By Webb Garrison

Go to catalog

This is a collection of Civil War images photographed by Mathew Brady and his assistants. On page 79, view the destruction on the Fredericksburg battlefield caused by a single projectile fired by gunners of the 2nd Massachusetts Heavy Artillery. Pages 152 and 153 show federal engineers rebuilding the town's infrastructure. Although the caption states that the rail track near the Potomac is being repaired, the photograph clearly refers to the Rappahannock. The photograph on page 232 shows the remains of the Phillips house that had been seized by General Burnside during his assault on the town. Look on page 251 for the last Fredericksburg photograph that Brady took. He used a telescopic lens and climbed to the top of a railroad bridge to make this photo of a group of men under the command of Robert E. Lee.

Reserve this title