Stafford County (Va.)

06/15/2017 - 1:18pm
Exciting Improvements at the Porter Branch

The Porter Branch is getting an exciting new look! Stafford County has contracted for “bookstore”-style shelving for the adult and teen collections, to be installed in July. These wooden shelves are lower and more attractive, allowing materials to be more accessible. Customers will no longer need to climb on a step stool to reach the top shelves! These shelves also provide increased visibility throughout the branch and will allow more natural light to shine through from the beautiful windows at the far end of the building.

06/14/2017 - 8:22am
Accessing the Old Newspapers of Fredericksburg

There have been newspapers published in Fredericksburg since 1788. (The only gap came in 1862-65, when the city was devastated by war.)  Fredericksburg has been a one-newspaper town – the Free Lance-Star –- since the 1920s, but before that many newspapers were published locally….

 

10/01/2016 - 12:30am
CRRL Guest Picks: Stafford Director of Elections Greg Riddlemoser

Greg Riddlemoser, Director of Elections and General Registrar for Stafford County, has elected to share his reading choices with the Central Rappahannock Regional Library community:

Making reading recommendations is always dicey. We like what we like, and we benefit from our reading in our own unique ways. I guess that is one of the things that make books soooo powerful. I offer below a smattering of the stuff I like from light to heavy.

08/23/2016 - 12:03am
Cover to Land of Herrings and Persimmons: People and Places of Upper Stafford County, Virginia

Every year brings a lot of newcomers to the northern Stafford area. At first glance, they may see its many stores, wide roads, and convenient subdivisions. That’s modern Stafford, bedroom community to D.C. and Quantico Marine Corps Base. But Stafford County has a significant place in history, too.

Well-known local historian Jerrilynn Eby’s Land of Herrings and Persimmons is a tremendous volume that chronicles the county’s farming and industrial past, place by place, including Stafford County communities that were enveloped and lost when Quantico was established.

08/04/2016 - 3:14pm
CRRL Guest Picks: John Chinn "Johnny Mac"

"I was born on the banks of the Rappahannock River. Taken Home to White Oak where I was raised and educated in the World's finest three-room university, White Oak School--now known as tribal member, artisan and historian D.P. Newton's Civil War Museum. Spent my time there with the other Patawomecks during World War Two getting lessons between the sounds of the big guns being tested at Dahlgren. They rattled the windows as the concussion came up through our Land. It was the sound of Freedom fighting back. We loved it. Attended Falmouth High and graduated from Stafford High. Graduated from a little Indian School in a place once known as Middle Plantation. Turned 78 nearly a year ago. Not much else to say, except, I am known as Johnny Mac."

05/22/2014 - 10:12am
White Oak Primitive Baptist Church

The simple house of worship on White Oak Road, across from the White Oak Civil War Museum, has its historic roots in the separation of church and state and was a hub of Union Army activity in the winter of 1862-63.

03/31/2014 - 2:41pm
Civil War Sites in Stafford County

Stafford County has a rich Civil War history including a naval battle, cavalry skirmishes, and Union encampments. Many of these Civil War sites can still be visited today.

02/19/2014 - 9:10pm
Samuel Pierpont Langley

1903 was a banner year for aircraft development, and Stafford County was on the bleeding edge of it. On December 17, Orville and Wilbur Wright had the first successful manned flight of a mechanical, heavier-than-air machine at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. But two months before that, on October 7, Samuel Pierpont Langley—with the blessings of Smithsonian—launched his design at Widewater in Stafford County. The only problem was, the well-funded flight crashed, dooming Langley’s dreams of being first in flight.

02/12/2014 - 1:49pm
Stafford's Coal Landing: Center of Commerce

By 1900 the forests had recovered sufficiently from the ravages of the Civil War to support a lumber business again. Long boats sailed from Coal Landing to Aquia Creek, up the Potomac and on to Baltimore.

Between 1890 and World War I, wood provided one of the few available cash incomes in Stafford. The locals would cut what timber they could and haul it to Coal Landing by wagon or boat to sell for pulpwood. The stacks of logs waiting at the docks were often forty feet high. Because the docks at Coal Landing were fairly extensive, there were a number of fishing boats that worked out of here, also.

12/19/2013 - 5:11pm
Aquia Landing

Aquia Creek would have so many tales to tell if only that were possible. The creek has been a vital part of the development of the county since Giles Brent established his home there in the late 1640s.

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