husbands and wives -- fiction

The Next Life Might Be Kinder by Howard Norman

The Next Life Might Be Kinder by Howard Norman

The Next Life Might Be Kinder, by Howard Norman, has one of those great first lines:  “After my wife, Elizabeth Church, was murdered by the bellman Alphonse Padgett in the Essex Hotel, she did not leave me.”

Storm Surge

By T. J. MacGregor

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CIA spooks and spirits of the dead unite with a violent tropical storm to complicate the latest murder case of Quin St. James and Mike McCleary.
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Coromandel Sea Change

By Rumer Godden

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Blaise and Mary arrive at Patna Hall, a hotel on India's shimmering Coromandel coast, to spend part of their honeymoon. Patna Hall is as beautiful and timeless as India itself, ruled over firmly and wise by proprietor Auntie Sanni. For Mary, it feels strangely like home. In a week that will change the young couple's destiny, election fever grips the Southern Indian state and Mary falls under the spell of the people, the country - and Krishnan, godlike candidate for the Root and Flower party...
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Changes and Chances

By Mary Elmblad

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On the eve of the inauguration of JFK, Oklahoma lawyer Cassie Steele moves with her congressman husband to Washington, D.C., where she encounters tragedy and a chance to start over again.
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Sky Burial: An Epic Love Story of Tibet

By Xinran

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"Shu Wen and her husband had been married for only a few months in the 1950s when he joined the Chinese army and was sent to Tibet for the purpose of unification of the two countries. Shortly after he left she was notified that he had been killed, although no details were given. Determined to find the truth, Shu Wen joined a militia unit going to the Tibetan north, where she soon was separated from the regiment.

"Without supplies and knowledge of the language, she wandered, trying to find her way until, on the brink of death, she was rescued by a family of nomads under whose protection she moved from place to place with the seasons and eventually came to discover the details of her husband’s death. … Xinran has recreated Shu Wen’s journey, writing beautifully and simply of the silence and the emptiness in which Shu Wen was enveloped. The book is an extraordinary portrait of a woman and a land, each at the mercy of fate and politics. It is an unforgettable, ultimately uplifting tale of love loss, loyalty, and survival."

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The Pull of the Moon

By Elizabeth Berg

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"Uncomfortable with the fit of her life, now that she's in the middle of it, Nan gets into her car and just goes--driving across the country on back roads, following the moon; and stopping to talk to people. Through conversations with women, men, with her husband through letters, and with herself through her diary, Nan confronts topics long overdue for her attention. She writes to her husband and says things she's never admitted before; and she discovers how the fabric of her life can be reshaped into a more authentic creation."
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