Stafford County (Va.)

John Francis Mercer of Stafford County: A Neglected Patriot: Captain of the 3rd Virginia; Anti-Federalist at the Constitutional Convention; Governor of Maryland, 1801-03

The Central Rappahannock region produced many of the men who led the fight for independence and fashioned the new American nation. Some are remembered, and afforded their due. Some, like John Francis Mercer, are not remembered -- but should be….

In the Path of History: Virginia between the Rappahannock and the Potomac: An Historical Portrait

By Nan Netherton, Ruth Preston Rose, Ross Netherton

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Tells of how the early Virginia counties developed along the Northern Neck from the beginnings of settlement through the Civil War period.
Includes an index and over 325 black and white as well as color images.
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Laying the Hoe: a Century of Iron Manufacturing in Stafford County, Virginia: with Genealogical Notes on over 300 Families

By Jerrilynn Eby

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For nearly a century, iron manufacturing dominated the economic, social, and political fabric of Stafford County, Virginia. In the mid-1720s Principio Iron Company, the eighteenth-century leader in American iron production, built a charcoal-fired blast furnace on Accokeek Run in Stafford. Accokeek’s furnace and store served customers within a six-county region. Employment opportunities at the furnace created a diversified economy and encouraged people from all walks of life to settle there.

The late 1750s witnessed the creation of James Hunter’s Iron Works near Falmouth. Originally intended as a forge and multi-purpose milling facility, this operation quickly grew to be the New World’s largest manufacturing center, producing a wide variety of consumer goods as well as quantities of weapons and supplies for Continental troops.

In addition to exploring the scope of each business and its impact upon the region in which it existed, the author has identified hundreds of people involved with or employed by Accokeek Furnace and Rappahannock Forge.
The only known surviving business ledger from Accokeek Furnace is included as a CD-ROM in the back of the volume.
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Men of Mark: Officials of Stafford County, Virginia, 1664-1991

By Jerrilynn Eby

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Burgesses, senators, and delegates -- Justices of the peace -- Miscellaneous county officials -- Post offices and post masters of Stafford -- Business licenses.

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Lincoln in Stafford

By Jane Hollenbeck Conner

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The Civil War brought Lincoln to rural Stafford County, Virginia, six different times for a total of fourteen days. These visits in 1862 and 1863 are described as depicted in soldiers' letter, journals, newspaper articles, a war correspondent's notes, drawings and photographs.

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Sinners, Saints and Soldiers in Civil War Stafford

By Jane Hollenbeck Conner

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Over 135,000 Union soldiers came to Stafford during the Civil War. This book relates the stories of six unique individuals who visited the area. The writings of these soldiers, nurses, and civilians help paint a picture of what Stafford and Fredericksburg were like during this devastating war.
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Stafford County, Virginia: Veterans and Cemeteries

By Homer D. Musselman

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A useful resource for genealogists as well as those interested in military history.

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They Called Stafford Home: The Development of Stafford County, Virginia, from 1600 until 1865

By Jerrilyn Eby

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The author gives a history of the county's regions, featuring the events and personalities that contributed to Stafford's beginnings and antebellum period.
Includes a timeline, bibliography, and index.
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