secrets -- fiction

Moon Over Manifest by Clare Vanderpoole

Moon Over Manifest by Clare Vanderpoole

Twelve-year-old Abilene Tucker jumped off the train in Manifest, Kansas, well before it officially stopped—and for good reason. Abeline was in a bit of a mood. She, who was used to criss-crossing the whole nation alongside of her beloved drifter dad Gideon, was being parked for an entire summer at the dustiest, driest town imaginable while he goes to work a railroad job in another state. In Moon Over Manifest, by Clare Vanderpoole, the year is 1938—about 20 summers since her Dad was here as a boy. The whole town, not just the lawns and the gardens, seems like it’s about to blow away in the June wind. What Abilene doesn’t realize is that this seemingly dead place is full of secrets and regrets just waiting to bubble to the surface.

Zelda and Ivy: Keeping Secrets

By Laura McGee Kvasnosky

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It's springtime, and little sister Ivy wants to prove she can keep a secret, but there are some secrets that are too good to keep. Big sister Zelda longs to play the perfect April Fool's Day prank, but can she outsmart the clever Ivy? And will opera star hopeful Zelda be upstaged by a butterfly in the final act? Fresh and funny, full of sugar and sass, this trio of tales about everyday life with siblings and friends is sure to strike a chord with young readers everywhere.

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What Was She Thinking? Notes on a Scandal

By Zoe Heller

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A lonely schoolteacher reveals more than she intends when she records the story of her best friend’s affair with a pupil in this sly, insightful novel Schoolteacher Barbara Covett has led a solitary existence; aside from her cat, Portia, she has few friends and no intimates. When Sheba Hart joins St. George’s as the new art teacher, Barbara senses the possibility of a new friendship. It begins with lunches and continues with regular invitations to meals with Sheba’s seemingly close-knit family. But as Barbara and Sheba’s relationship develops, another does as well: Sheba has begun a passionate affair with an underage male student. When it comes to light and Sheba falls prey to the inevitable media circus, Barbara decides to write an account in her friend’s defense—an account that reveals not only Sheba’s secrets but her own.

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