older people

The Measure of My Days

By Florida Scott-Maxwell

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"Playwright and Jungian analyst Florida Scott-Maxwell explores the unique predicament of one's later years: when one feels both cut off from the past and out of step with the present; when the body rebels at activity but the mind becomes more passionate than ever. Written when Maxwell was in her eighties, The Measure of My Days offers a panoramic vision of the issues that haunt us throughout our lives: the struggle to achieve goodness; how to maintain individuality in a mass society; and how to emerge -- out of suffering, loss, and limitation -- with something approaching wisdom."

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Old Friends

By Tracy Kidder

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A study of old age in America focuses on two nursing-home residents whose friendship allows them to understand their past, cope with their present circumstances, and confront their futures with hope.
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Living Happily Ever After: Couples Talk About Lasting Love

By Laurie Wagner

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"How do couples stay together for decades? Living Happily Ever After explores this crucial question through the lives of thirty American couples who have been together for at least thirty years. In personal, intimate interviews and charming vintage and contemporary photographs, these pairs reveal their private experiences of marriage and couplehood. From Gil and Becky Johnson, both blind, who have raised three children together, to Helma and Benno Schneider, who came together in a concentration camp and survived to marry and raise a family, to Del Martin and Phyllis Lyon, women who met in the 1950s and have stayed together for over forty years, these couples have lived extraordinary lives."

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His Oldest Friend: The Story of an Unlikely Bond Across Generations

By Sonny Kleinfield

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"They met under the least auspicious circumstances. He was a teenage volunteer at a nursing home on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. She was a wheelchair-bound resident in her nineties. He was poor, Hispanic, living in a rented room in the barrio, separated from his family. Her life, at least before arthritis hobbled her, was comfortable, and her daughters and grandchildren visited as often as they could. But when Margaret Oliver’s daughter hired Elvis Checo to look in on her mother a few afternoons each week, nobody realized that this would be the beginning of a beautiful friendship."

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Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters' First 100 Years

By Sarah and A. Elizabeth Delany

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"Warm, feisty, and intelligent, the Delany sisters speak their mind in a book that is at once a vital historical record and a moving portrait of two remarkable women who continued to love, laugh, and embrace life after over 100 years of living side by side. Their sharp memories show readers the post-Reconstruction South and Booker T. Washington; Harlem's Golden Age and Langston Hughes, W.E.B. DuBois, and Paul Robeson. Bessie breaks barriers to become a dentist; Sadie quietly integrates the New York City system as a school teacher."

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A Reporter's Life

By Walter Cronkite

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Written when Cronkite was 80, his memoirs cover his 60 years as a reporter. This fascinating recounting of the experiences of the nation's "most trusted person" is sure to bring back memories of years gone by.

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