Libraries

05/30/2017 - 2:49am
The Card Catalog: Books, Cards and Literary Treasures

For the better part of the 20th century, the card catalog stood as a gateway to the wonders of the library. In The Card Catalog: Books, Cards and Literary Treasures, the Library of Congress celebrates the importance of the card catalog throughout library history.

The card catalog is seen as one of the most versatile and durable organizational scheme developed throughout history. It is the map to go to if you want to navigate your way through the vast wilderness of books. Although the beginnings of the card catalog started off slowly, it now covers every subject, from ancient to modern history, in libraries around the world. Peter Devereaux, writer-editor for the Library of Congress, notes that the catalog is a "tangible example of humanity's effort to establish and preserve the possibility of order."

05/24/2017 - 1:41pm

Ruth Sawyer lived an extraordinary life. Though born many years before women had the right to vote, there is no doubt that she was a thoroughly independent and extremely intelligent woman with a knack for collecting stories and retelling them.

She did more than collect interesting tales and set them in books, although that would be enough for many writers. But Ruth did more. For her, connecting children with stories was critical.  After attending the Garland Kindergarten Training School, she moved to Cuba in 1900 to teach storytelling to teachers working with children who were orphaned during the Spanish-American War.

08/10/2015 - 10:25am
Marketing

We were recently interviewed for possible inclusion in a book about word-of-mouth-marketing.  The authors are intrigued with how we market our library services and resources not just to our patrons, but also to our funding organizations, other libraries, and other organizations.  For example, staff have used free software programs to create a video entitled "Who Needs the Public Library?," which you can view on YouTube in our crrlvideo "channel."

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