military families

If I Ever Get Out of Here by Eric Gansworth

If I Ever Get Out of Here by Eric Gansworth

If I Ever Get Out of Here centers around Lewis Blake, a Native American teenager in a gifted junior high program. Lewis might be academically successful, but he has no friends. All his white classmates don't have much to say to Lewis, and all of the kids from the reservation are just in the regular classes.

It is 1976, and living outside of Buffalo, New York, Lewis wonders if the area's teachers are going to be surprised when they find that the Native American kids are not that excited about the country's Bicentennial celebration. His family has called this land "home" for much longer than a mere two hundred years.

While They're at War: The True Story of American Families on the Homefront

By Kristin Henderson

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"We meet two very different women, Marissa Bootes and Beth Pratt, both newlyweds experiencing life alone at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, while their husbands are fighting in Iraq. Through the extraordinary stories of these and other military spouses, Kristin Henderson reveals the overwhelming effects of separation -- from fears of death to worries about financial stability and marital fidelity. She also explores the official and unofficial support systems that strain to help home front families endure some of their greatest challenges."

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The Right Stuff

By Tom Wolfe

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The true story of Alan Shepard, Gus Grissom, John Glenn, Scott Carpenter, Walter Schirra, Gordon Cooper and Deke Slayton - the seven men chosen to launch the U.S. into space - and their wives.

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The Homefront Club: The Hardheaded Woman's Guide to Raising a Military Family

By Jacey Eckhart

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"On the American home front during the ongoing war on terror, no one is feeling the pressure more than military families. Operating tempo is expected to increase. Projected deployments are going to be longer. Our presence in Iraq alone is projected to be at least five years. This news means that military families who have been pressed to the limit since 9/11 are wondering just how they are going to keep the marriage together, raise good kids, and maintain some semblance of normalcy. For the past six years, Jacey Eckhart has written a popular column, 'The Homefront,' running twice weekly in the Norfolk Virginian-Pilot. Through her work, she is asked frequently to speak to deploying commands, training sessions, church groups, reservists, and retirees. They call her 'The Voice of the Military Family.'

"'It is a job I love,' she says, 'but it doesn't do enough. Every week I get requests for past columns about moving, infidelity, in-laws, kids, deployment, and "that one about geographic bachelors."' Current books written for military families don't cover those topics. They admirably address the nuts and bolts of military life. They tell the least initiated spouse what to call the chief and when to get in touch with Navy Relief and how to sign up for dental insurance. But they don't offer any kind of philosophy about how to live well within the military community. Eckhart's book addresses this need, a need that has grown all the more glaring post-9/11."

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