Teenage Boys

Kasher in the Rye by Moshe Kasher

Kasher in the Rye by Moshe Kasher

If memoirs are written to both connect with the reader and exorcise the writer's personal demons, then Moshe Kasher had one gigantic, stinky, firebreathing, sword-wielding demon.

His debut book's title says it all: Kasher in the Rye: The True Tale of a White Boy from Oakland Who Became a Drug Addict, Criminal, Mental Patient, and Then Turned 16. Sure the Salinger-inspired pun is as obvious as a rhino stampede, but Moshe Kasher has had quite a colorful life. A life that I would not want to wish on my worst enemy.

Now a stand-up comic, Kasher was born to not one, but two, deaf parents. Mom and Dad separated within a year of his birth, and his mother took him and his older brother from Brooklyn to Oakland where a life of food stamps, less than stellar public schools, and years of therapy awaited them. This menagerie of elements was perfect for young Moshe (who at the time went by the less-Semitic name Mark) to rebel.

Me and Orson Welles

By Robert Kaplow

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It is 1937, and Richard Samuels, a New Jersey teenager while wandering through Manhattan, lands the role of Lucius in Julius Caesar. This is a coming of age story revolving around the young teen and the show's star Orson Welles.
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Diary of a Witness

By Catherine Ryan Hyde

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Ernie, an overweight high school student and long-time target of bullies, relies on his best friend Will to watch his back until Will, overwhelmed by problems at home and guilt over his brother's death, seeks a final solution.

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The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind by William Kamkwamba

William Kamkwamba first encountered the magic that ruled Malawi when he was six. Herd boys found a  sack in the road; it was filled with bubblegum!  What a treasure! "Should we give any to this little boy with leaves in his hair?", they asked. Of course they did, a double handful of gumballs: so many colors.  William ate them all.

Bottled Up

By Jaye Murray

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A high school boy comes to terms with his drug addiction, life with an alcoholic father, and a younger brother who looks up to him.
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Saint Iggy

By K.L. Going

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Iggy Corso, who lives in city public housing, is caught physically and spiritually between good and bad when he is kicked out of high school, goes searching for his missing mother, and causes his friend to get involved with the same dangerous drug dealer who deals to his parents.
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Rooftop

By Paul Volponi

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Still reeling from seeing police shoot his unarmed cousin to death on the roof of a New York City housing project, seventeen-year-old Clay is dragged into the whirlwind of political manipulation that follows.
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Shooting Star

By Fredrick McKissack, Jr.

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Jomo Rogers, a naturally talented athlete, starts taking performance enhancing drugs in order to be an even better high school football player, but finds his life spinning out of control as his game improves.
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You Hear Me? Poems and Writing by Teenage Boys

By Betsy Franco (editor)

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In this powerful collection of more than 70 uncensored poems and essays, more than 50 teenage boys from across the country explore their many-layered concerns, including identity, love, envy, gratitude, sex, anger, and more. Accompanied by black-and-white photographs.

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The War Against Boys: How Misguided Feminism is Harming Our Young Men

By Christina Hoff Sommers

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It's a bad time to be a boy in America. As the century drew to a close, the defining event for American girls was the triumph of the U.S. women's soccer team. For boys, the symbolic event was the mass killing at Columbine High School. It would seem that boys in our society are greatly at risk. Yet the best-known studies and the academic experts say that it's girls who are suffering from a decline in self-esteem. It's girls, they say, who need extra help in school and elsewhere in a society that favors boys. The problem with boys is that they are boys, say the experts. We need to change their nature. We have to make them more like... girls. These arguments don't hold up to scrutiny, says Christina Hoff Sommers in this provocative, fascinating book.
 

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