African American poets

My People

By Langston Hughes

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Acclaimed photographer Charles R. Smith Jr. interprets Hughes’ beloved poem in vivid sepia photographs that capture the glory, the beauty, and the soul of being a black American today.
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Letter to My Daughter

By Maya Angelou

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"Dedicated to the daughter she never had but sees all around her, Letter to My Daughter reveals Maya Angelou's path to living well and living a life with meaning. Whether she is recalling such lost friends as Coretta Scott King and Ossie Davis, extolling honesty, decrying vulgarity, explaining why becoming a Christian is a 'lifelong endeavor,' or simply singing the praises of a meal of red rice--Maya Angelou writes from the heart to millions of women she considers her extended family."

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Who Will Cry for the Little Boy?

By Antwone Quenton Fisher

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"With the publication of Finding Fish, his memoir of a childhood spent in foster homes in and around Cleveland, Antwone Fisher shared with the world his story of perseverance, determination, and courage. And he also showed that within him beat the heart of an artist -- a major factor in his resilience and recovery. Now with Who Will Cry for the Little Boy?, his first collection of poetry, Antwone Fisher reveals the inner truths that took him from a tumultuous childhood to the man he is today.

"The powerful poems presented here range from impressions and expressions of Antwone's years growing up to the love that he has gained from the family he made for himself as an adult. From the title poem -- which is featured prominently in the movie Antwone Fisher -- a plaintive, haunting tribute to a childhood lost to abuse and neglect, to 'Azure Indigo,' the uplifting and touching poem about his daughters, many readers will find their own feelings and experiences reflected in this lyrical and passionate collection."

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Pushed Back to Strength: A Black Woman's Journey Home

By Gloria Wade-Gayles

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"This Spelman College English professor and poet weaves back and forth through time, fashioning a richly textured autobiographical tapestry of her emotional, spiritual, and intellectual maturation as a southern black female."

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The Rose That Grew From Concrete

By Tupac Amaru Shakur

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Tupac’s untimely death silenced a voice of great influence in rap. His poems are just one of his legacies. This collection of more than 100 poems that honestly and artfully confront topics ranging from poverty and motherhood to Van Gogh and Mandela is presented in Tupac Shakur's own handwriting on one side of the page, with a typed version on the opposite side.

 

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