English colonies

Seeds of Discontent: The Deep Roots of the American Revolution, 1650-1750, by J. Revell Carr

Seeds of Discontent: The Deep Roots of the American Revolution, 1650-1750, by J.

The American Revolution didn’t start with the Tea Party.

For more than 100 years before that, the immigrants who came to America had very cogent reasons for leaving the civilized world. Many were hotheads—rebels against the king and his policies on religion. Others had come to the colonies hoping to make their fortunes and discovered much to their dismay that the king was very interested in taking a cut of their profits through high taxes, particularly on tobacco.

In Virginia, high taxes meant that the small farmers were left landless when they could not pay. Their farms were taken by wealthier landholders and the dispossessed went to the frontier to find new land to support them and their families. Not surprisingly, this meant clashes with the native population, some of which were quite bloody. Royal Governor Berkeley’s refusal to support the frontier farmers with soldiers—and his obvious friendships with the wealthier Tidewater land barons--led to Bacon’s Rebellion against the king’s most powerful representative and was but one example of the tension felt between the colonists and their royal masters’ representatives.

Sir Walter Raleigh: Founding the Virginia Colony

By Nancy Ward

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"Examines the early life and explorations of Sir Walter Raleigh and Raleigh's legacy. When England's Queen Elizabeth I asked Sir Walter Raleigh to search for new lands to claim and colonize, her loyal subject pledged to found a colony in tribute to his Queen. This exciting recreation of the founding, loss, and reclamation of the Virginia colony in the late 1500s also describes Raleigh's unsuccessful search for the fabled wealthy kingdom of El Dorado, the deterioration of his relationship with the Queen, and his eventual execution."

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