literary figures

Thoreau's Maine Woods

By Henry David Thoreau and Dan Tobyne, photographer

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Beginning in 1847, Henry David Thoreau made three trips to the mostly unexplored Maine woods. Along the way he recorded his observations on the wildlife (flora and fauna), the weather, terrain, and on the nature of the people he met along the way, including loggers, rivermen, and his Abnaki guides. In Thoreau's Maine Woods, photographer Dan Tobyne captures the essence of the Maine Thoreau discovered and described in his book. The combination of short excerpts with stunning imagery carries Thoreau's work to a higher level, presenting it in both glowing words and pictures.

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Literary Converts: Spiritual Inspiration in an Age of Unbelief

By Joseph Pearce

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The twentieth century has been marked by both belief and unbelief. While church attendance has declined, the lives of many of the more salient figures of our times have been influenced and inspired by Christianity.

Wilde through the looking-glass -- Belloc, Baring and Chesterton -- The archbishop's son -- The bishop's son -- Dawson and Watkin -- Benson's Cambridge apostolate -- The attraction of orthodoxy -- Religion and politics -- Knox and Benson -- Knox and Chesterton -- War and Waste Land -- Poetry in commotion -- Graham Greene, Catholic sceptic -- Waugh and Waste Land -- Controverting converts -- Chesterton and Baring -- War and rumour of war -- War of words -- Nuclear reactions -- Cultivating culture -- A network of minds -- Militants in pursuit of the truth -- Spark and Sitwell -- Alec Guinness -- Sassoon and Knox -- Contra mundum -- Ringing out the old -- Small is beautiful -- Muggeridge, pilgrimage and passion -- Ends and loose ends -- Painting God Greene -- Celtic twilight.

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Who Murdered Chaucer: A Medieval Mystery

By Terry Jones

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"In this work of historical speculation Terry Jones and a team of international scholars investigate the mystery surrounding the death of Geoffrey Chaucer over 600 years ago.… What if he was murdered? What if he and his writings had become politically inconvenient in the seismic social shift that occurred with the overthrow of the liberal Richard II by the reactionary, oppressive regime of Henry IV? … This hypothesis is the introduction to a reading of Chaucer's writings as evidence that might be held against him, interwoven with a portrait of one of the most turbulent periods in English history, its politics and its personalities."

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