memoirs

11/14/2017 - 2:47pm
If you liked Fun Home by Alison Bechdel

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations to fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids. You can browse other book matches here.

Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic by Alison Bechdel
This book takes its place alongside the unnerving, memorable, darkly funny family memoirs of Augusten Burroughs and Mary Karr. It's a father-daughter tale perfectly suited to the graphic memoir form. Meet Alison's father, a historic preservation expert and obsessive restorer of the family's Victorian house, a third-generation funeral home director, a high school English teacher, an icily distant parent, and a closeted homosexual who, as it turns out, is involved with male students and a family babysitter. Through narrative that is alternately heartbreaking and fiercely funny, we are drawn into a daughter's complex yearning for her father. And yet, apart from assigned stints dusting caskets at the family-owned 'fun home,' as Alison and her brothers call it, the relationship achieves its most intimate expression through the shared code of books. When Alison comes out as homosexual herself in late adolescence, the denouement is swift, graphics, and redemptive. (catalog summary)

If you like Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic, check out these similar titles.

Calling Dr. Laura: A Graphic Memoir by Nicole J. Georges

Calling Dr. Laura: A Graphic Memoir
by Nicole J. Georges

When Nicole Georges was two years old, her family told her that her father was dead. When she was twenty-three, a psychic told her he was alive. Her sister, saddled with guilt, admits that the psychic is right and that the whole family has conspired to keep him a secret. Sent into a tailspin about her identity, Nicole turns to radio talk-show host Dr. Laura Schlessinger for advice. Calling Dr. Laura tells the story of what happens to you when you are raised in a family of secrets, and what happens to your brain (and heart) when you learn the truth from an unlikely source. (catalog summary)
 

10/18/2017 - 1:43am
Book Corner: On Writing

November will be bringing our library community both Veterans Day and NaNoWriMo. If you’ve thought of trying your hand at writing about the war experience, you’ll want to attend our workshop, “When Fiction Goes to War: Creating Characters in and after Combat.” Steve Watkins, award-winning local author and past instructor of journalism, creative writing, and Vietnam War literature at the University of Mary Washington, will lead this program for veterans, their family members, and anyone else who wants to hone their writing skills. To be held at Porter Branch, 2001 Parkway Boulevard, Stafford, November 11, 9:45-10:45 am, this program is part of our larger Writers Conference.

06/14/2017 - 2:34pm
My Librarian: The Roaring Twenties

After the horrors of World War I and the resulting social trauma, young men and women who survived came to be known as The Lost Generation because they never recovered from all of their losses and suffering. To deal with their pain, many of them lived by the adage, “Eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die.” The Roaring Twenties, also known as the Jazz Age, was born.  

05/14/2016 - 1:42pm
Cover to Exhilarating Prose

Writing is a peculiar art. Some people seem to be born with a distinctive style and voice which comes effortlessly to them. Most of us, however, need to work hard to learn the fundamentals and are constantly seeking to improve our ability to craft sentences, create paragraphs, and organize a coherent series of ideas which make up a well-written book or article. 

03/04/2016 - 2:55pm
CRRL My Librarian: Food and Cooking Memoirs

“The sharper your knife, the less you cry.”

                                                       -Kathleen Flinn

Chefs dominate the cooking industry; the big ones have TV shows, cookbooks, their own magazines. Because of them, there are cooking shows for every taste and better produce in your local market. Here is a selection of notable memoirs; two of the authors uplifted home cooking in America.

08/24/2011 - 2:25pm
Fires of Vesuvius: Pompeii Lost and Found

But not ON the beach: pages oily from suntan lotion; wind and sand. Nah, bad for paper. Watching pelicans cruise over the waves is preferred. Knowing we would hit the Beach Book Mart, a bookshop in Atlantic Shores with an interesting historical selection, I packed two books. One of those plus two of the three store-bought titles had a thread: Italy.

First down the chute is Norman Douglas’ Siren Land, a memoir of  Capri and the Sorrentine Peninsula. Two previously read authors, Paul Fussell and Elizabeth Davis, quoted and discussed Douglas, and the library owns the title. I found his prose dense, witty fairly often, even had a couple funny bits. It is more than a travelogue: it is learned and chatty. Emperor Tiberius was the first famous Roman to retire to Capri; his stay is touched on. Douglas includes stories of saints, a single thread  of the story of these siren lands. History and biology of the sirens is knocked off in the first couple of chapters, followed by a wandering over the land, a boat ride or two, and an island full of fleas...with gossip, lore, architecture, history, and memorable characters.

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