Bette Davis Eyes

Her career started almost at the beginning of the talking motion picture and continued until her death in 1989. Her speciality was playing the wicked woman role, and no one could do it better.

Now, Voyager

By Bette Davis, Paul Henreid, Claude Rains

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A young woman escapes the smothering influence of her wealthy and very conservative mother through the help of a psychiatrist and an ocean cruise, where she finds love, which helps her to become her own person.

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Jezebel

By Bette Davis, George Brent, Henry Fonda

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Julie Marsden, a headstrong and unconventional beauty in pre-Civil War New Orleans, lashes out in revenge when she is scorned by the man she loves.

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In This Our Life

By Bette Davis, Olivia de Havilland, George Brent, Dennis Morgan, Hattie McDaniel

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Bette Davis stars as Stanley Timberlake, the kind of villainess audiences love to hate. Jilting her fiance, she runs off with her sister's husband, drives him to booze & suicide, then tries to tear apart the romance that's blossomed between her sister & her former flame.

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Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?

By Bette Davis, Joan Crawford

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In a decaying Hollywood mansion, Jane Hudson, a former child star, and her sister Blanche, a movie queen forced into retirement after a crippling accident, live in virtual isolation.

Special features: commentary by author and film historian, Charles Busch and film historian John Epperson; three fabulous documentary profiles of the movie and its two immortal stars: Bette and Joan ; "Blind ambition": a new making-of documentary; all about Bette, biographical profile, hosted by Jodie Foster;  film profile: Joan Crawford; vintage featurette "Behind the scenes with 'Baby Jane'";  The Andy Williams Show excerpt featuring Bette Davis.

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Dead Ringer

By Bette Davis, Karl Malden, Peter Lawford

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The story concerns two twin sisters: unmarried Edith with no money, no future and widow Margaret who has fabulous wealth - all because of her marriage to the man she stole from Edith years ago. Seeking revenge, Edith kills Margaret and takes her place. But new friends and new surroundings may expose her masquerade.

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Dark Victory

By Bette Davis, George Brent, Humphrey Bogart, Geraldine Fitzgerald, Cora Witherspoon. Ronald Reagan, Henry Travers

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Davis stars as a glamorous and somewhat frivolous socialite who matures and falls in love with her doctor while dying from a brain tumor. Geraldine Fitzgerald is wonderful as her best friend. Humphrey Bogart and Ronald Reagan also have small parts in this film. Have a box of tissues handy.

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Dark Victory: The Life of Bette Davis

By Ed Sikov

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"She was magnificent and exasperating in equal measure. Jack Warner called her 'an explosive little broad with a sharp left.' Humphrey Bogart once remarked, 'Unless you're very big she can knock you down.' Bette Davis was a force of nature--an idiosyncratic talent who nevertheless defined the words 'movie star' for more than half a century and who created an extraordinary body of work filled with unforgettable performances. In Dark Victory, the noted film critic and biographer Ed Sikov paints the most detailed picture ever delivered of this intelligent, opinionated, and unusual woman who was--in the words of a close friend--'one of the major events of the twentieth century.'

"Drawing on new interviews with friends, directors, and admirers, as well as archival research and a fresh look at the films, this stylish, intimate biography reveals Davis's personal as well as professional life in a way that is both revealing and sympathetic. With his wise and well-informed take on the production and accomplishments of such movie milestones as Jezebel, All About Eve, and Now, Voyager, as well as the turbulent life and complicated personality of the actress who made them, Sikov's Dark Victory brings to life the two-time Academy Award-winning actress's unmistakable screen style, and shows the reader how Davis's art was her own dark victory."

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All About Eve

By Bette Davis, Anne Baxter

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"Both Anne Baxter and Bette Davis were nominated for best actress in this film. Neither won, but Bette Davis' leading role as Margo Channing is considered her greatest career performance and her most memorable, signature role. The screen play by Joseph L. Mankiewicz was based on a radio play by Mary Orr and tells the story of an ambitious young actress who tries to build a career by worming her way into the life of the great Broadway star Margo. When Margo finally understands the extent of Eve's treachery Davis gets to utter her most famous line,'Fasten your seat belts, it's going to be a bumpy night.'"

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Agatha Christie's Murder with Mirrors

By Bette Davis, Helen Hayes

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This made for television movie, based on the Agatha Christie mystery They Do It with Mirrors, featured Helen Hayes, in her last film, as Miss Marple and Bette Davis as her friend Carrie. When Miss Marple investigates why her friend’s health is failing, a dead body shows up, and the two old friends need to solve the mystery quickly.

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The Girl Who Walked Home Alone: Bette Davis, a Personal Biography

By Charlotte Chandler

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"Drawing on extensive conversations with Bette Davis during the last decade of her life, Charlotte Chandler gives us a biography in which the great actress speaks for herself. The author also spoke with directors, actors, and others who knew and worked with Davis. Though she owed everything to her mother, Ruthie, Bette Davis remained fascinated all her life by her hard-to-please father, who walked out on his family. She remembered the disappointment - which never left - over her father's lack of interest in her, and she believed that her resentment of him was probably a major factor in her four failed marriages. She spoke happily of her love affairs with Howard Hughes and William Wyler; she recalled her leading men, favorite co-stars, and unloved rivals; and she took great care to refute the persistent Hollywood legend that she was difficult to work with. Alone and ill, she faced her last days with bravery and dignity."

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