Holiday Closing: All branches will be closed starting at 5:00 pm Wednesday, Nov. 25 and continuing Thursday, Nov. 26 and Friday, Nov. 27 for the Thanksgiving holiday.

National Park Service

09/03/2015 - 2:37pm
After Appomattox: Civil War History Series at the Library

Ever wonder what happened after Lee's surrender to Grant that fateful day at Appomattox? Did everyone simply go back home and pick up their lives as they once were?

Three of the best historians from the National Park Service will present three different topics on three evenings at the HQ Library theater from 7:00-8:00. Each program is designed to give you information you may not have heard before and an opportunity to ask questions.

06/19/2015 - 12:45pm
Free History at Sunset Tours Explore the Civil War

Each summer, the National Park Service offers free History at Sunset tours which give insights into our area’s Civil War past. Hosted by Park Service historians, they are a tremendous treat for history lovers. Unless otherwise noted, tours begin at 7pm and last about 90 minutes. Here is their schedule and our suggested titles to go with each topic:

03/12/2012 - 11:45am
War So Terrible: A Popular History of the Battle of Fredericksburg, by Donald C.

Excerpt from War So Terrible: A Popular History of the Battle of Fredericksburg, by Donald C. Pfanz, (pp. 44-46)

Donald C. Pfanz is staff historian with Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park. He is also the author of Abraham Lincoln at City Point and Richard S. Ewell: A Soldier’s Life.  This chapter is reprinted on CRRL's history site with his permission.

“The Sacking of Fredericksburg”

By the time the fighting ended on Dec. 11, Fredericksburg was desolate.  Fighting in the streets combined with a bombardment by more than 180 cannons had left the venerable old town shattered and ruins.  Those citizens who had not fled Fredericksburg had seen their homes riddled with bullets, shot and shell.

06/22/2010 - 2:59pm

Between April and September 1862, an estimated 10,000 slaves fled the South through our region. As part of the local Civil War Sesquicentennial commemorations, the Trail to Freedom project was designed to give the public a better understanding of the experiences of those whom the war impacted greatly but are often only a footnote in history books.

12/07/2009 - 4:33pm

One hundred and forty-seven years ago, lines of blue advanced on a hillside near the outskirts of Fredericksburg. Those heights were manned by gray-uniformed soldiers, powerfully well-armed and rather surprised that the Union commander should send wave after wave of troops into their maelstrom of cannon and rifle fire. What followed was a slaughter about which Confederate General Robert E. Lee said, "It is well that war is so terrible...we should grow too fond of it."


Subscribe to National Park Service