History

03/29/2010 - 11:48am

Norman Rockwell's Rosie the Riveter poster encouraged women to roll up their sleeves and get on the job in factories to make munitions and equipment to supply American troops in World War II.

03/15/2010 - 9:42am

She took the throne as a young and somewhat malleable girl, married for love, and spent the greater part of her reign as the formidable Widow of Windsor. Her children and grandchildren held thrones throughout Europe, and the Age of Victoria was known for both domestic reform and colonial conquest. Her long and fascinating life has been the subject of numerous books, films, and television series.

02/25/2010 - 3:32pm

Twentieth-century illustrator Norman Rockwell reflected in his work much of what was good in America. He is known for his sweet depictions of small-town life—soda fountains, family scenes, Boy Scouts, town meetings, doctors’ offices, and boys with dogs—but one of his most touching images was a painful one from the Civil Rights Era: “The Problem We All Live With.”

01/27/2010 - 10:39am

On Tuesday, January 26, 2010, the University of Mary Washington invites the public to a free lecture on Thomas Jefferson.

05/05/2011 - 4:34pm

    Thanksgiving disasters usually take the form of dried-out turkey or not enough mashed potatoes.  But for the Peterkin family, proper Victorians all, Thanksgiving disaster strikes when their dinner simply disappears.  In “The Peterkins’ Thanksgiving,” Elizabeth Spurr has adapted one of Lucretia Hale’s charming stories about this hapless family into a picture book edition illustrated with cheerful whimsy by Wendy Anderson Halperin.

11/11/2009 - 11:50am

“I was reading a book at the time and at 10.59 the guns all quit at once. It was to [sp] good to be true. I didn’t cheer as I cheered myself hoarse while at Souilly and it was a false report so I didn’t want to do it again. It wasn’t long till the Co came back. They were turned back just as they came under shell fire. One of K Co men got a shrapnel in the arm at the last minute. The boys looked more like gohsts [sp] than human when they came in, for want of rest and grub but that night we all sure put away some sleep."

11/12/2009 - 8:58am

On this day, we remember the sacrifice of soldiers in England, the United States, and France who fought and died in the Great War, the war to end all wars. While their noble goal is not yet realized, their noble deeds continue to be honored from the 1921 burial of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery to our daily remembrances of those who have been or are in the armed services.

11/12/2009 - 3:27pm

Seems as though every time there is an incident like the recent tragedy at Fort Hood, Clint Van Zandt turns up on TV, offering insight into what has happened and how to understand it. Van Zandt is well known for having been, for many years an FBI major crimes analyst, “profiler” and hostage negotiator. You may not know that he is today the president of a local business, Van Zandt Associates – an international risk and threat management consulting firm.

11/03/2009 - 3:34pm

From the Central Rappahannock Regional Library

Fort Lowry and Raiders on the Rappahannock by Carroll M. Garne.
A study of the Confederate fort, whose construction south of Fredericksburg was ordered by General Lee in 1861. Fort Lowry was designed to protect the Rappahannock waterway and used mines to damage Federal vessels. Includes chapters on John Wilkes Booth's attempted escape through the nearby countryside.

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