Women's History Month

A Is for Abigail: An Almanac of Amazing American Women

By Lynne Cheney

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Each letter of the alphabet is represented by an important woman in the history of the United States, as well as others in her same field of accomplishment.

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She Sang Promise: The Story of Betty Mae Jumper, Seminole Tribal Leader

By Jan Godown Annino

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"Betty Mae Tiger Jumper was born in 1923, the daughter of a Seminole woman and a white man. She grew up in the Everglades under dark clouds of distrust among her tribe who could not accept her at first. As a child of a mixed marriage, she walked the line as a constant outsider. Growing up poor and isolated, she only discovered the joys of reading and writing at age 14. An iron will and sheer determination lead her to success, and she returned to her people as a qualified nurse. When her husband was too sick to go to his alligator wrestling tourist job, gutsy Betty Mae climbed right into the alligator pit! Storyteller, journalist, and community activist, Betty Mae Jumper was a voice for her people, ultimately becoming the first female elected Seminole tribal leader."
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Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions by Women

By Catherine Thimmesh

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Tells the story of how women throughout the ages have responded to situations confronting them in daily life by inventing such items as correction fluid, space helmets, and disposable diapers.
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Let It Shine: Stories of Black Women Freedom Fighters

By Andrea Davis Pinkney

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"Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a bus and sparked a boycott that changed America. Harriet Tubman helped more than three hundred slaves escape the South on the Underground Railroad. Shirley Chisholm became the first black woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. The lives these women led are part of an incredible story about courage in the face of oppression; about the challenges and triumphs of the battle for civil rights; and about speaking out for what you believe in--even when it feels like no one is listening."
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Remember the Ladies: 100 Great American Women

By Cheryl Harness

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n a letter cautioning her husband to "Remember the Ladies," Abigail Adams makes a plea for women's rights. She realized that women had the potential for greatness if only their brethren would, as Sarah Grimke wrote in 1838, "take their feet from off our necks."

Cheryl Harness introduces readers to 100 illustrious American women. From colonial poet Phillis Wheatley and Civil War nurse Clara Barton to comic actress Lucille Ball and Vietnam Memorial architect Maya Ying Lin, she highlights ladies of all talents, races, and eras.

Cheering the advancements of recognizable leaders, the author also introduces readers to less familiar but equally important women. Her passion and humor reflect the attitudes of pioneers who pushed the boundaries of the feminine sphere to the limits -- and then pushed a little further.

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Fight on! Mary Church Terrell's Battle for Integration

By Dennis Brindell Fradin & Judith Bloom Fradin

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Profiles the first black Washington, D.C. Board of Education member, who helped to found the NAACP and organized of pickets and boycotts that led to the 1953 Supreme Court decision to integrate D.C. area restaurants.

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Joan of Arc

By Shana Corey

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"A lovely beginning reader that brings the story of Joan of Arc to life, from her simple childhood to her tragic end. Sensitively and dramatically told, this book is a wonderful introduction to what has become a classic tale."
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Different Like Coco

By Elizabeth Matthews

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"Coco couldn't afford to dress like the corseted ladies of high society and she was never going to be shapely. There was no point in trying to be like them. Instead, she tried to be different."

The rags-to-riches story of Coco Chanel plays out in a wonderful picture-book biography that is as full of style and spirit as its heroine is.

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Rosalind Franklin and the Structure of Life

By Jane Polcovar

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A biography of the scientist whose unpublished research led to the discovery of the structure of DNA.
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Yours For Justice, Ida B. Wells: The Daring Life of a Crusading Journalist

By Philip Dray

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"Journalist Ida B. Wells, a tireless crusader for justice and civil rights, faced her greatest challenge when she confronted the heinous practice of lynching. In 1863, when Ida B. Wells was not yet two years old, the Emancipation Proclamation freed her from the bond of slavery. For her family and others like them, it was a time of renewed faith in America's promise of 'freedom and justice for all.' Blessed with a strong will, an eager mind, and a deep belief in this promise, young Ida never turned away from the challenges she faced. She insisted on holding her family together after the death of her parents. She defied convention and went to court when a railroad company infringed on her rights. And she used her position as a journalist to speak out about injustice. But Ida's greatest challenge arose after one of her friends was lynched. How could one headstrong young woman help free America from the 'shadow of lawlessness' that loomed over the country?"
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