Women's History Month

Independent Dames: What You Never Knew about the Women and Girls of the American Revolution

By Laurie Halse Anderson

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"The stories of 22 'Revolutionary Grandmothers' take center stage in this well-illustrated volume. A few of the names are familiar—Phillis Wheatley, Martha Washington, Abigail Adams, Deborah Sampson—but as the author establishes, there are many women and girls whose large and small contributions to the cause of independence have been largely ignored. Prudence Wright and Sarah Shattuck guarded their village when the men were fighting at Concord and Lexington, and they captured a British spy. After her husband was killed in battle, Margaret Corbin fired his cannon until she was shot, making her the first American woman to receive a military pension. Whether the women were disguising themselves as men in order to be soldiers, raising money for suffering soldiers, sewing and knitting for the troops, or participating in protests or a boycott of British goods, their actions were significant." -- School Library Journal
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Sweethearts of Rhythm: The Story of the Greatest All-girl Swing Band in the World

By Marilyn Nelson

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In the 1940s, as the world was at war, a remarkable jazz band performed on the American home front. This all-female band, originating from a boarding school in the heart of Mississippi, found its way to the most famous ballrooms in the country, offering solace during the hard years of the war. They dared to be an interracial group despite the cruelties of Jim Crow laws, and they dared to assert their talents though they were women in a "man's" profession. Told in thought-provoking poems and arresting images, this unusual look at our nation's history is deep and inspiring.

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A Look at the Nineteenth Amendment: Women Win the Right to Vote

By Helen Koutras Bozonelis

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Looks at the reasons for the adoption of the 19th Amendment, describes the laws it sets forth, and discusses challenges to and violations of the amendment.
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Mrs. Lincoln's Dressmaker: The Unlikely Friendship of Elizabeth Keckley & Mary Todd Lincoln

By Lynda Jones

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In 1868, a controversial tell-all called Behind the Scenes introduced readers to Elizabeth Hobbs Keckley. Mrs. Keckley was a former slave who had been Mary Todd Lincoln's dressmaker and friend during the White House years, and in the aftermath of President Lincoln's assassination. How could such a bond have developed between a woman born into slavery and the First Lady of the United States? Mrs. Lincoln's Dressmaker answers this question by chronicling the extraordinary lives of these women.
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Anne Hutchinson

By Susan Bivin Aller

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In colonial Massachusetts, only men could be preachers. Anne Hutchinson angered church leaders by preaching about God during meetings in her home. The church leaders put Anne on trial for her spiritual teachings.
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Nurse, Soldier, Spy: The Story of Sarah Edmonds, a Civil War Hero

By Marissa Moss

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A story of a nineteen-year-old woman who disguised herself as a man to avoid an unwanted marriage and who distinguished herself as a male nurse during the Civil War, and later as a spy for the Union Army.
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Basketball Belles: How Two Teams and One Scrappy Player Put Women's Hoops on the Map

By Sue Macy

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Raised on a cattle ranch, Agnes Morley was sent to Stanford University to learn to be a lady. Yet in no time she exchanged her breeches and spurs for bloomers and a basketball; and in April 1896 she made history. In a heart-pounding game against the University of California at Berkeley, Agnes led her team to victory in the first-ever intercollegiate women's basketball game, earning national attention and putting women's basketball on the map.
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Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony: A Friendship That Changed the World

By Penny Colman

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In the Spring of 1851 two women met on a street corner in Seneca Falls, New York - Elizabeth Cady Stanton, a thirty-five year old mother of four boys, and Susan B. Anthony, a thirty-one year old, unmarried, former school teacher. Immediately drawn to each other, they formed an everlasting and legendary friendship. Together they challenged entrenched beliefs, customs, and laws that oppressed women and spearheaded the fight to gain legal rights, including the right to vote despite fierce opposition, daunting conditions, scandalous entanglements and betrayal by their friends and allies. W
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Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom (With a Few Flat Tires along the Way)

By Sue Macy

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"Take a lively look at women's history from aboard a bicycle, which granted females the freedom of mobility and helped empower women's liberation. Through vintage photographs, advertisements, cartoons, and songs, Wheels of Change transports young readers to bygone eras to see how women used the bicycle to improve their lives. Witty in tone and scrapbook-like in presentation, the book deftly covers early (and comical) objections, influence on fashion, and impact on social change inspired by the bicycle, which, according to Susan B. Anthony, 'has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world.'"

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Those Courageous Women of the Civil War

By Karen Zeinert

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Examines the important contributions of various women, Northern, Southern, and slave, to the American Civil War, on the battlefield, in print, on the home front, and in other areas where they challenged traditional female roles.

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