Computer Privacy

Web Browser Privacy Options and Extensions

Web Browser Privacy Options and Extensions

In Google Chrome it’s called “Incognito Mode.” Firefox has dubbed it “Private Browsing.” Internet Explorer? “InPrivate Browsing.” This is the browser feature you can use to temporarily disable storage of your browsing history, text field inputs (such as usernames and passwords, not to mention searches), and cookies. These modes are great for keeping secrets from others using the same computer, but they won’t hide anything from the rest of the Web. What I'm offering will.

Repurposing Your Old PC

Repurposing Your Old PC

Updated November 15, 2013: Your old computer is capable of one more major feat: helping to cure diseases.

Choose Privacy, Always

Choose Privacy

The American Library Association’s Choose Privacy Week was May 1-7.  Oops—dropped the ball on that one.  Still, one of the key points of Choose Privacy Week is that privacy awareness is something we all have to take seriously all the time, particularly online. A common mistake when considering privacy is assuming that it is something we possess naturally and have taken away from us by others. The reality is that privacy is something we have to actively claim for ourselves and work for every day. Our electronic world does not allow for anything less.  People become understandably indignant when their sense of privacy is violated. I’m not trying to blame the victim—indeed, the potential victims are any or all of us. Nevertheless, we need to recognize that today’s world of hyper-connectivity and big data doesn’t allow us the luxury of treating privacy as a given.  

First, let’s get real about privacy:

The Sad State of Passwords

image of random password

Here’s the hard truth: your password, well, it’s no good.  Does it include a word found in the dictionary, a name, a date, or even numbers that look like letters (e=3, I-1, o=0, etc.)?  Yup, no good.  Do you use the same password for some or even all your websites?  Tsk, tsk.  The practice of password cracking has never been easier thanks to a number of landfall events for hackers, namely the release into the public of numerous huge password databases from hacked websites and the development of more advanced and specialized tools. What’s worse, the security of your password isn’t always wholly dependent on you but on the websites you use.  I know it’s hard; you have trouble remembering your passwords, etc., and I’m sorry, but in today’s world those excuses just aren’t acceptable.  Practicing good password hygiene isn’t a suggestion if you want to survive online, it is now a requirement.  Please read on!