Poetry

10/25/2016 - 3:53pm
Celebrate Local Authors!

Porter Branch will host the Local Authors Reception on Tuesday, November 15, 7:00–8:30. Come find great reads while celebrating the authors who live in our area.

Writers will get a chance to showcase their work, what they’re working on now, and whom they would recommend reading.

Whether you’re interested in checking out the talent, buying books, or just want to know more about what it takes to become an author, this event is for you!

Interested in what our local authors have written? Check out these titles: CRRL Picks: Local Authors.

04/01/2015 - 8:54am

Ethiopia-the faraway land on the horn of Africa, was Jane Kurtz's home when she was a young girl. Her parents were missionaries there, and her playmates were dark-skinned, smiling children. They mostly lived in grass-covered huts with dirt floors covered with mats—as did Jane and her family. The boys might work as cattle herders; the girls would help their mothers with cooking until it was time for them to be married.

01/05/2015 - 2:03pm

To open a book illustrated by Floyd Cooper is to be drawn into a world of warmth, bravery, and joy. His drawings are as essential as the text itself in illuminating the world of childhood, often of the Black experience.

He was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in 1956. Early on, his family lived in the projects and had little money, but his mother was able to give him a sense of self-worth that he has carried with him always. She also shared stories with him, helping to build his imagination.

09/01/2011 - 10:02am

He was trouble, into everything at once, with an imagination that just wouldn't quit. Neither his teachers nor his parents knew quite what to do with him. But when he opened his mouth the most beautiful sounds came out. Young Jack Prelutsky had a glorious voice, so good they called him a prodigy, and the New York Metropolitan Opera's choirmaster gave him free lessons. But he gave up his dream of being the world's best opera singer when he heard Luciano Pavarotti perform. He knew he couldn't match that amazing voice, and he did know for certain that whatever he did in his life, he wanted to be the very best at it.

06/14/2011 - 2:06pm
Claudia Emerson

This interview airs beginning June 15.
Several books of her poetry received praise and recognition even before Claudia Emerson received a Pulitzer Prize for Late Wife. She is a former Poet Laureate of Virginia and also an inspiring teacher at the University of Mary Washington. Debby Klein visits Claudia to listen to her poems and share her experiences on CRRL Presents, a Central Rappahannock Regional Library production.

04/13/2011 - 8:14am
New and Selected Poems: Volume 1 by Mary Oliver

The National Academy of American Poets has a simple way for people to celebrate National Poetry month: "Select a poem, pocket it, carry it, and share it with family, friends, and coworkers throughout the day." The 4th annual "Poem in Your Pocket day," celebrated on April 14, encourages poetry lovers of all ages to read and share a poem in celebration of this fantastic art form.

06/22/2010 - 1:23pm

BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE

Alicia Suskin Ostriker is one of our country’s finest poets. She lives in Princeton, New Jersey. I thought that today you might like to have us offer you a poem full of blessings.

The Blessing of the Old Woman, the Tulip, and the Dog

To be blessed
said the old woman
is to live and work
so hard
God’s love
washes right through you
like milk through a cow

06/22/2010 - 1:21pm

BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE

Equipment. I like to paint and draw, and I own enough art supplies to start my own store. And for every hobby there are lots of supplies that seem essential. In this poem we get a whole tackle box full of equipment from Michael Sowder, who lives and fishes in Utah.

Fishing, His Birthday

06/07/2010 - 3:59pm

BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE

Whether we like it or not, we live with the awareness that death is always close at hand, and in this poem by Don Thompson, a Californian, a dead blackbird can’t be pushed out of the awareness of the speaker, nor can it escape the ants, who have their own yard work to do.

Yard Work

My leaf blower lifted the blackbird—
wings still spread, weightless,
floating on the loud, electric wind
almost as if it were alive.

06/01/2010 - 9:58am

BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE

Barnyard chickens, which are little more than reptiles with feathers, can be counted on to kill those among them who are malformed or diseased, but we humans, advanced animals that we think we are, are far more likely to just turn away from people who bear the scars of misfortune. Here’s a poem by Ned Balbo, who lives and teaches in Maryland.

Fire Victim

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