U.S. Navy

Great Lives Lecture Series: The Pacific Admirals of World War II

Cover to The Admirals: Nimitz, Halsey, Leahy, and King—The Five-Star Admirals Wh

The University of Mary Washington's 2013 Chappell Great Lives Lecture Series continues on Tuesday, March 26, with a lecture on the Pacific admirals of World War II by Walter R. Borneman, author of The Admirals: Nimitz, Halsey, Leahy, and King—The Five-Star Admirals Who Won the War at Sea.

"They were an unlikely quartet. All were graduates of the United States Naval Academy, but each came to display wildly different personality and leadership styles. Nimitz was the epitome of the stern but loving grandfather, but heaven help the man who let him down. Halsey was the hale-hearty fellow who through charisma and rough charm came to personify the American war effort in the Pacific. Leahy was the steady hand—almost invisible to the public but essential to Franklin Roosevelt’s decision-making. King was the demanding, hard-edged perfectionist who gave no quarter to superiors and subordinates alike and who was seemingly quite proud of his terrifying reputation.  These four Fleet Admirals played critical and occasionally controversial roles in the defining events, tactics, and developing weapons that won World War II, including submarines, aircraft carriers, and naval air power."
 
Find out more about this lecture on the University of Mary Washington's web site.
 
All lectures in the university's Great Lives series are held at 7:30pm, in Dodd Auditorium, George
Washington Hall, and are free and open to the public.
 
For more on this topic, check out these items from the library:
 
Admiral “Bull” Halsey: The Life and Wars of the Navy’s Most Controversial Commander by John Wukovits
Economically and convincingly refurbishes a WWII hero inappropriately grown unfashionable. (Publishers Weekly)

The Admirals: Nimitz, Halsey, Leahy, and King – the Five-Star Admirals Who Won the War at Sea by Walter R. Borneman
Drawing upon journals, ship logs, and other primary sources, he brings an incredible historical moment to life.  (Amazon.com)
 

John Paul Jones: A Founder of the U.S. Navy

From a Scottish port to colonial Fredericksburg to the royal courts of France and Russia, the little man who famously refused to give up the fight was perfectly at home in both cottages and elegant salons, but he was always eager to set sail for adventure and glory.

John Paul Jones

By Scott Ingram

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Contents: From apprentice to master -- From fugitive to lieutenant -- Early years of a new navy -- Across the Atlantic -- The wait and the great battle -- A forgotten hero.
John Paul Jones has a Fredericksburg connection through his family.
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The Battle of Hampton Roads

From the Central Rappahannock Regional Library

Battle of the Ironclads: The Monitor and the Merrimack by Alden R. Carter.
This book for elementary school students examines the construction, battles, and technological and historical impact of the Civil War battleships, the Monitor and the Virginia (Merrimack).
C.S.S. Virginia: Mistress of Hampton Roads by John V. Quarstein.
A lengthy account of the naval battle. Available to read in the Virginiana Room.
Part of the Virginia Regimental Histories series.

Duel Between the First Ironclads by William C. Davis.
The author weaves fascinating personal and historical detail into his narrative.
Also available as an eBook. Click here for more information on this collection.

Duel of the Ironclads: The Monitor vs. the Virginia by Patrick O'Brien.
A short book (36 pages) that is appropriate for elementary students who are just beginning to develop a taste for history.

Ironclad: The Epic Battle, Calamitous Loss, and Historic Recovery of the USS Monitor

By Paul R. Clancy

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"A cheesebox on a shingle," scoffed one observer as the USS Monitor steamed slowly toward the Confederacy's hulking iron battleship in March 1862. But the odd-looking contraption with its revolving gun turret revolutionized naval warfare.Its one great battle in the spring of 1862 marked the obsolescence of wooden fighting ships and may have saved the Union. Its terrible end in a winter storm off Cape Hatteras condemned sixteen sailors to a watery grave. And the recovery of its 200-ton turret in August 2002 capped the largest, most complex and hazardous ocean salvage operation in history.
(From the publisher's description)

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Reign of Iron: The Story of the First Battling Ironclads, the Monitor and the Merrimack

By James L. Nelson

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The first ironclad ships to fight each other, the Monitor and the Virginia (Merrimack), were the unique products of American design genius and ingenuity, North and South. In one afternoon, in a battle that lasted four hours, they ended the three-thousand-year tradition of wooden men-of-war and ushered in, as Admiral John A. Dahlgren called it, "the reign of iron."In this absorbing history, novelist, historian, and tall-ship sailor James L. Nelson, through in-depth research and a storyteller's voice, brilliantly recounts the story of these magnificent ships, the men who built and fought them, and the extraordinary battle that made them legend.
(Publisher's description)

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Duel of the Ironclads: The Monitor vs. the Virginia

By Patrick O'Brien

Go to catalog

A short book (36 pages) that is appropriate for elementary students who are just beginning to develop a taste for history.

Reserve this title

Duel Between the First Ironclads

By William C. Davis

Go to catalog

The author weaves fascinating personal and historical detail into his narrative.
Also available as an eBook.

Reserve this title

C.S.S. Virginia: Mistress of Hampton Roads

By John V. Quarstein

Go to catalog

A lengthy account of the naval battle. Available to read in the Virginiana Room.
Part of the Virginia Regimental Histories series.

Reserve this title

Battle of the Ironclads: The Monitor and the Merrimack

By Alden R. Carter

Go to catalog

This book for elementary school students examines the construction, battles, and technological and historical impact of the Civil War battleships, the Monitor and the Virginia (Merrimack).

Reserve this title