All branches will be closed on Sunday, May 27, and Monday, May 28 for Memorial Day. eBooks, eAudio, and eMagazines are available 24/7!

My Librarian

05/07/2018 - 10:07am
Cover to Oh No! (Or How My Science Project Destroyed the World) by Mac Barnett and illustrated by Dan Santat

A bright young girl runs through the chaos of demolished streets. Plumes of black smoke rise from the rubbled buildings. No one else is in sight. Oh No! (Or How My Science Project Destroyed the World) is a life lesson that everyone should receive: always take responsibility for your actions, particularly when they involve a ginormous hulking robot with the power to crush cars and shoot lasers every which way.

Usually, when my school science projects went wrong, it was more of a mild disappointment than anything else. My baking-soda-and-vinegar volcano did not erupt. I received a C- instead of a B+. These are minor hiccups when compared to our main character’s situation. Oh No! allows us to think about our own mistakes and say, “Well, it could have been worse…much, much worse.”

05/01/2018 - 9:10am
Cover to A Whole Nother Story

There are a lot of stories out there: boy wizards, girl detectives, wimpy kids, and underpantsed captains. Despite the many possibilities and numerous titles to read, there may be that ever-lurking fear that there is not a story out there for you. In this is the case, you might want to avoid a panic attack by taking a note from Dr. Cuthbert Soup, head of the National Center for Unsolicited Advice.

04/24/2018 - 10:13am
The Bad Guys by Aaron Blabey

Sharks. Snakes. Piranhas. Wolves. What do all these have in common? They're bad guys. In fact, they're really bad guys. They are never, ever, ever good guys. But, what if they were tired of being bad guys? What if Mr. Wolf decided he'd like to try being a good guy...perhaps even a hero? That's the question in Aaron Blabey's The Bad Guys

04/17/2018 - 8:46am
Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds

Will’s brother Shawn is dead. After watching him get gunned down on the streets, now Will has to do what’s expected. He has to follow The Rules.

04/11/2018 - 10:45am
Cover to Chesapeake Bay Cooking with John Shields

When “Baltimore boy” and chef John Shields brought his Chesapeake Bay-style cooking to California years ago, he was urged to write a cookbook about the regional cuisine. Chesapeake Bay Cooking with John Shields is in its 25th anniversary edition now, but its recipes and reminiscences are as fresh as they are delicious.

04/02/2018 - 1:59am
Cover to Spectacular Spring: All Kinds of Spring Facts and Fun by Bruce Goldstone

If your young child likes vivid photographs with lots going on and lots to think about, your family will enjoy sharing Spectacular Spring: All Kinds of Spring Facts and Fun, by Bruce Goldstone. Like many of the Dorling-Kindersley books, this one has two ways to read it.

For example, one headline reads, “Days Get Longer." You might prefer to just go from headline to headline for the youngest listeners. As your children grow and their interest levels in the details of the world around them increase, bring in the rest of the words on the page. Below "Days Get Longer," you'll see, “Spring begins on the vernal equinox. In the Northern Hemisphere, that’s a day near March 20 when day and night are both 12 hours long.”

For older readers/listeners, there are also pages devoted to some of those how-and-why questions, with their own bright illustrations, such as, “How Do Umbrellas Work?” and “Seeds Travel in Many Ways.”

03/22/2018 - 10:32am
Cover to Is It Passover Yet? By Chris Barash, with pictures by Alessandra Psacharopulo

Chris Barash’s Is It Passover Yet? is a sweet and gentle choice for young children who are excited as Passover draws near. Through simple rhyming text and bright, clear pictures, we first see the signs of spring—animals frisking and plants growing. Then, we see a human family is getting ready for a special time, too. They clean the house together and make traditional dishes for their expected visitors.

02/28/2018 - 12:38am
Cover to King's Fool: A Notorious King, His Six Wives, and the One Man Who Knew All Their Secrets

Will Somers was nobody’s fool—until he became the King’s Fool. Born in the medieval English countryside, he should have led the rest of his life unremarkably, as an undersized farmhand who happened to be able to read and write and add figures—and tell jokes, which there wasn’t much need for on his uncle’s small farm.

02/06/2018 - 9:17am
Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel

Actor Arthur Leander has experienced a number of peaks and valleys in his lengthy Hollywood career. As he prepares to take the stage as King Lear in what will be his final performance, he’s hardly at the top of his game. Hard living and a separation from his only son have taken their toll, and Arthur succumbs to a heart attack as the audience watches. Kirsten, a young child also in the production, is traumatized by Arthur’s death and will remember this day far into the future.

Pages

Subscribe to My Librarian