Pocahontas

The Powhatan Confederation

By Jane Kosa

Pocahontas, the Powhatan princess who befriended the Jamestown colonists, married the Englishman John Rolfe in 1614, and is believed by many to have saved John Smith's life -- that is why the world knows the Powhatan Confederacy. Her father, Powhatan, almost alone, united the small scattered Algonquian tribes of present-day Virginia and Delaware into a thirty tribe group in the late 1500s. We know this group as the Powhatan Confederacy. The Confederacy included 128 Algonquian villages and 20,000+ people at its peak in the early 1600s.

The Double Life of Pocahontas

By Jean Fritz

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A biography of the famous American Indian princess, emphasizing her life-long adulation of John Smith and the roles she played in two very different cultures.

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Life of the Powhatan

By Rebecca Sjonger & Bobbie Kalman

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Discusses the Powhatan, their daily activities, customs, family life, religion, and the story of Pocahontas.

 

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The Story of Pocahontas

By Caryn Jenner

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Examines the life of the Indian princess Pocahontas and her contact with English settlers, especially John Smith.
A level 2 reader.
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Pocahontas: Princess of the New World

By Kathleen Krull

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She was the favored daughter of the Chief of the Powhatan Indians, and a girl in motion; always laughing, teasing, and dancing. But from the moment John Smith and the colonists of Jamestown set foot into her world in 1607, her life would change forever. She soon became an ambassador and peace keeper between the Powhatan and the colonists. Because of her curiosity and courage, Pocahontas became the bridge between the two worlds.
(From the publisher's description)

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Good Wives, Nasty Wenches & Anxious Patriarchs: Gender, Race, and Power in Colonial Virginia

By Kathleen M. Brown

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A feminist examination of the roles of women of different classes--lower class white, upper class white, slave, and Indian--in colonial Virginia, with much reliance on primary sources.

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Empires in the Forest: Jamestown and the Beginning of America

By Avery Chenoweth ; photographs, Robert Llewellyn

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"This beautiful work of photography and prose traces the ways in which American culture grew out of the conflict that characterized the first contact between Native Americans and Europeans."
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Pocahontas, Powhatan, Opechancanough: Three Indian Lives Changed by Jamestown

By Helen C. Rountree

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"Despite their roles as senior politicians in these watershed events, no biography of either Powhatan or Opechancanough exists. And while there are other "biographies" of Pocahontas, they have for the most part elaborated on her legend more than they have addressed the known facts of her remarkable life. As the 400th anniversary of Jamestown's founding approaches, nationally renowned scholar of Native Americans, Helen Rountree, provides in a single book the definitive biographies of these three important figures. In their lives we see the whole arc of Indian experience with the English settlers -- from the wary initial encounters presided over by Powhatan, to the uneasy diplomacy characterized by the marriage of Pocahontas and John Rolfe, to the warfare and eventual loss of native sovereignty that came during Opechancanough's reign."
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Pocahontas and the Powhatan Dilemma: An American Portrait

By Camilla Townsend

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"...differs from all previous biographies of Pocahontas in capturing how similar seventeenth-century Native Americans were-in the way they saw, understood, and struggled to control their world-not only to the invading English, but also to ourselves.Neither naive nor innocent, Indians like Pocahontas and her father, the powerful king Powhatan, confronted the vast might of the English with sophistication, diplomacy, and violence. Indeed, Pocahontas's life is a testament to the subtle intelligence that Native Americans, always aware of their material disadvantages, brought to bear against the military power of the colonizing English."
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Love and Hate in Jamestown: John Smith, Pocahontas, and the Heart of a New Nation

By David A. Price

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A gripping narrative of one of the great survival stories of American history: the opening of the first permanent English settlement in the New World. Drawing on period letters and chronicles, and on the papers of the Virginia Company–which financed the settlement of Jamestown–David Price tells a tale of cowardice and courage, stupidity and brilliance, tragedy and costly triumph. He takes us into the day-to-day existence of the English men and women whose charge was to find gold and a route to the Orient, and who found, instead, hardship and wretched misery. Death, in fact, became the settlers’ most faithful companion, and their infighting was ceaseless.

Price offers a rare balanced view of the relationship between the settlers and the natives. He unravels the crucial role of Pocahontas, a young woman whose reality has been obscured by centuries of legend and misinformation (and, more recently, animation). He paints indelible portraits of Chief Powhatan, the aged monarch who came close to ending the colony’s existence, and Captain John Smith, the former mercenary and slave, whose disdain for class distinctions infuriated many around him–even as his resourcefulness made him essential to the colony’s success.
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