20th century

Virginia's Northern Neck: A Pictorial History

By John C. Wilson

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Virginia's Northern Neck: A Pictorial History is filled with photos and illustrations that, along with informative text, give an lively dimension to the region's past, from early settlements to steamboat days to 20th-century lives well-lived.

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Chesapeake Waters: Four Centuries of Controversy, Concern, and Legislation

By Steven G. Davison

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"...chronicles four centuries of public attitudes about the Bay - and legislative responses to them - from 1607, the date of the first English settlement in Jamestown, Virginia, to the close of the twentieth century. In the last few decades, wide-reaching measures by federal and local governments have influenced how people use the Bay: the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency completed a massive study of Bay quality; the Chesapeake Bay Program was launched; the Critical Area Protection Act went into effect."
(From the publisher's description)

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Chesapeake Rumrunners of the Roaring Twenties

By Eric Mills

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Focusing on the Chesapeake Bay area, Mills (a journalist and historian associated with the U.S. Naval Institute) depicts those on both sides of the law during prohibition--bootleggers, still-operators, and mobsters, as well as the police, federal agents, Coast Guardsmen, and temperance crusaders. His account draws from local lore, with the backing of newspaper reports and government documents.
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The Oyster Wars of the Chesapeake Bay

By John R. Wennersten

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In the decades following the Civil War, Chesapeake Bay became the scene of a life and death struggle to harvest the oyster, one of the most valuable commodi­ties on the Atlantic coast. In this book, noted historian and author John Wennersten tells the stories of wa­termen, law enforcement officers, government officials, Bay scientists, immi­grants, and oyster shuckers involved in the oyster trade.
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Reluctant Genius: Alexander Graham Bell and the Passion for Invention

By Charlotte Gray

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Inventor of the telephone and teacher of the hearing impaired, Bell kept his summer home at Colonial Beach in Westmoreland County, now a bed & breakfast inn.
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Alvin, Recollections and Reflections

By John Harding, Jr.

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Though listed in our catalog as fiction, this biography interweaves much truth in its retelling of the life of Alvin "Stack" Wormley, an actual person born in 1912 in the Northen Neck. He worked as a farmer, fisherman, oysterman, in a canning factory and fought in World War II. The author knew and liked this man and set down some of his many conversations with him. After Alvin Wormley's death, John Harding, Jr. interviewed his friends and relatives to better tell the tale of an upstanding, uncommon man.
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A History of Our Own: Stafford County, Virginia

By Albert Z. Conner, Jr.

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Mr. Conner's book gives Stafford County its own place in American history, from the 17th to the 20th centuries. Filled with photographs and illustrations, this handsome book gives an excellent overview of the county's development and includes noteworthy individuals and events that impacted the area.
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Before and After Jamestown: Virginia's Powhatans and Their Predecessors

By Helen C. Rountree and E. Randolph Turner III

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Addressed to specialists and nonspecialists alike, Before and After Jamestown introduces the Powhatans--the Native Americans of Virginia's coastal plains who played an integral part in the life of the Williamsburg and Jamestown settlements--in scenes that span 1,100 years, from just before their earliest contact with non-Indians to the present day.

This first comprehensive overview of the Powhatans emphasizes how the Powhatan jigsaw has been pieced together with bits of evidence from archaeology, history, and cultural anthropology. Synthesizing a wealth of documentary and archaeological data, the authors have produced a book at once thoroughly grounded in scholarship and accessible to the general reader. Recognized authorities in Powhatan archaeology and ethnography, they have also extended the historical account through the native people's long-term adaptation to European immigrants and into the immediate present and their continuing efforts to gain greater recognition as Indians.
(From the publisher's description)

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Virginia in Maps: Four Centuries of Settlement, Growth, and Development

By Richard W. Stephenson and Marianne M. McKee

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Virginia's long and rich history is documented by thousands of maps that trace the discovery, settlement, expansion, and growth of the commonwealth, yet no comprehensive atlas of the entire state has ever been published. Virginia in Maps fills that void, providing access to more than 200 color images of the most important maps of the colony and of the state in a single, large-format volume. The atlas's five essays by leading cartographic scholars will make it an essential reference and educational tool.
(From the publisher's description)
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