20th century

Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania Court House

By John F. Cummings III

Go to catalog

Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania County both witnessed the ravages of America's defining drama. This is the story of a town forced into exodus by the harsh hand of war and of the strength that helped its residents find rebirth from the ashes of destruction. This shared experience would bring people like John Henry Myer and Joseph Walker into a united community, despite diverse backgrounds and racial differences. Fredericksburg had enjoyed prosperity as a colonial-era tobacco port, but economic and agricultural changes diminished this importance.
By the 1850s, Fredericksburg had been eclipsed by Richmond to the south and Alexandria to the north. Shortly before the Civil War, a small industrial boom revitalized the town only to be cast asunder by the events of 1861-1865. Ten miles south is Spotsylvania Court House, the county seat. Here too, fate would deal a blow as warring armies raged over the pastoral setting, leaving destruction in their wake.
From the publisher's description.

Reserve this title

Stafford County

By De'Onne C. Scott

Go to catalog

Fascinating photos of people and places from Stafford's past.
Part of the Images of America series.

Reserve this title

Old-house Dictionary: An Illustrated Guide to American Domestic Architecture (1600-1940)

By Steven J. Phillips

Go to catalog

"From a one-room cabin to a beaux-arts mansion, here is a concise and easily understandable architectural dictionary. Contains more than 450 illustrations, 1,500 terms, 750 definitions and 17 useful cross-references for anyone interested in American domestic architecture."

Reserve this title

Americans at Home: Four Hundred Years of American Houses

By Lee Pennock Huntington

Go to catalog

This children's selection tells how architectural styles have changed in America.

Reserve this title

Working Children

By Carol Saller

Go to catalog

Learn what it was like to be one of the more than two million kids in 1900 who worked instead of going to school and what was done to make their lives better.

Reserve this title

We Shall Not Be Moved: The Women's Factory Strike of 1909

By Joan Dash

Go to catalog

Thousands of young girls came all alone to New York City looking for work, and they found it in the factories, making lovely dresses for a cheap wage. Finally, Clara Lemlich had had enough. She stood up at her work table and announced in Yiddish, which most of the girls understood, that she had a plan to make things better. This book tells the beginnings of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union, one of the first unions to recognize that women, as well as men, deserved decent pay and better hours.

Reserve this title

We Have Marched Together: The Working Children's Crusade

By Stephen Currie

Go to catalog

The fight to regulate child labor went on for many years, but this book tells the particular story of children who worked in the textile mills and marched with Mother Jones from Philadelphia to New York City in 1903.

Reserve this title

Mapping the Past

With Google's now infamous detailed photos, it's rather easy to see how a town is laid out today. But what about 50, 100, or 150 years ago? Where are the maps that show how the towns and counties grew through the years? One excellent source of information, the Sanborn fire insurance maps, is available online to our patrons at no charge.