Civil War medicine

Civil War Medicine: 1861-1865

By C. Keith Wilbur

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A good choice for getting a grounding in the subject or school reports. Many illustrations.

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A Southern Woman's Story: Life in Confederate Richmond

By Phoebe Yates Pember

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Phoebe Yates Pember penned the story of her time as chief matron at Chimorazo Hospital in Richmond shortly after the Civil War.

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Civil War Medicine, 1861-1865

By C. Keith Wilbur

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Dr. C. Keith Wilbur takes you on a detailed and fascinating tour through the medical history of this bloody and devastating war.

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Civil War Doctor: The Story of Mary Walker

By Carla Joinson

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A biography of Mary Edwards Walker was one of the first women to receive a medical degree in the United States and went on to serve as a doctor to the Union soldiers during the Civil War. Her unconventional and determined life paved the way for generations of women in medicine and beyond.

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Incidents of Hospital Life in 1864

By Phoebe Yates Pember

There were long discussions among those responsible during the war, as to the advisability of the frequent amputations on the field, and often when a hearty, fine-looking man in the prime of life would be brought in minus an arm or a leg, I would feel as if it might have been saved, but experience taught me the wisdom of prompt measures. Poor food and great exposure had thinned the blood and broken down the system so entirely that secondary amputations performed in the hospital almost invariably resulted in death, after the second year of the war. The blood lost on the battlefield when the wound was first received would enfeeble the already impaired system and render it incapable of further endurance.

The Blue, the Gray, and the Crimson: A Quick Examination of Civil War Medicine

When Christmas morning dawned in December of 1862, the sun rose over the battered town of Fredericksburg. Once a bustling colonial port, more recently a pleasant stop for travelers by coach and boat, on this day, the little town lay in ruins. And, if the brick and mortar firmaments suffered such catastrophic damage, what of the flesh and bone of the human armies that had battled there mere weeks before? What became of the wounded who survived the first days of battle?