Battle of Spotsylvania Court House

There He Stands: The Story of Stonewall Jackson

By Bruce L. Brager

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He was quiet, religious, and perhaps a little boring. But he was Lee's most trusted general, making his "Stonewall" reputation by standing fast at the First Battle of Bull Run. When he was shot by friendly fire in Spotsylvania, Lee lost one of his best generals. This biography includes photographs, reproductions, and maps.
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In the Footsteps of Grant and Lee: The Wilderness through Cold Harbor

By Gordon C. Rhea, photographs by Chris E. Heisey

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 In the Footsteps of Grant and Lee combines engaging text and striking photos to tell the story of those battles that became known as the Overland Campaign--the Wilderness, Spotsylvania Court House, the North Anna River, Totopotomoy Creek, Bethesda Church, and Cold Harbor.

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The Spotsylvania Campaign

By Gary W. Gallagher, Editor

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In this comprehensive assessment of the Spotsylvania Campaign, top military historians examine one of the bloodiest clashes in the Civil War--the confrontation between Grant and Lee over a two-week period in May of 1864. 43 illustrations. 8 maps.
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The Spotsylvania Campaign: May 7-21, 1864

By John Cannan

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Spotsylvania was a dramatic clash between individual units and a desperate holding action fought by Robert E. Lee as the sands were running out for the Confederacy. This the story of one of the Civil War's most tragic battles and is enhanced by sidebars, specially commissioned maps, and detailed orders of battle and casualty figures based on recent research at the National Archives.
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The Battles for Spotsylvania Court House and the Road to Yellow Tavern, May 7-12, 1864

By Gordon C. Rhea

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The sequel to the author's The Battle of the Wilderness, May 5-6 1864, an award-winning account of the pivotal Civil War confrontation in Virginia recounts Lee's magnificent defense at Spotsylvania and Grant's costly attack.
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Bloody Roads South: The Wilderness to Cold Harbor, May-June 1864

By Noah Andre Trudeau

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In this authoritative chronicle of the great 1864 Overland Campaign in Virginia, Noah Andre Trudeau vividly re-creates the brutal forty days that marked the beginning of the end of the Civil War. In riveting detail Trudeau traces the carnage from the initial battles in Virginia's Wilderness to the gruesome hand-to-hand combat at Spotsylvania's "Bloody Angle," to the ingenious trap laid by Lee at the North Anna River, to the killing ground of Cold Harbor.
Through fascinating eyewitness accounts, he relates the human stories behind this epic saga. Common soldiers struggle to find the words to describe the agony of their comrades, incredible tales of individual valor, their own mortality. Also recounting their experiences are the women who nursed these soldiers and black troops who were getting their first taste of battle. The raw vitality of battle sketches by Edwin Forbes and Alfred R. Waud complement the words of the participants.
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To the North Anna River: Grant and Lee, May 13-25, 1864

By Gordon C. Rhea

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Rhea looks at the initial campaign between Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee between May 13 and 25, 1864--a phase that was critical in the clash between the Army of the Potomac and the Army of Northern Virginia. Rhea charts the generals' every step and misstep in their efforts to outfox each other.
Includes illustrations and maps.

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Civil War Diary of A.L. Peel, Adjutant, 19th. Mississippi Regiment: April 29-30 -- May 1863, The Battle of Chancellorsville

By A. L. Peel

 Editor's note:
Albert Peel was raised in Mississippi. At 17, he left the Kentucky Military Institute to come home and enlist in the 19th Mississippi Regiment. He was killed May 12, 1864, at Spotsylvania's Bloody Angle and is buried in the Confederate Cemetery near Spotsylvania Courthouse. These diary entries, written a year previously, tell of the Battle of Chancellorsville.

Wednesday, April 29 - Orders came this evening to fall in to fight. Major Hardin went to take command of the right wing which was on picket. Col. Harris was absent so I formed the left wing & formed on the 12 Regt, marched in quick time to the Chanseller Hotel, & Genl. Posey sent us on picket 1½ mile up the road. I put out 2 Companies in advance as pickets. Col. Harris came to us at 9 p.m. Our pickets brought in a prisoner who reported that a company of the enemy had crossed at germanias ford.