Film

Masters of Suspense: Alfred Hitchcock and Daphne du Maurier

Give them pleasure. Same pleasure they have when they wake up from a nightmare.

      --Alfred Hitchcock in an interview with the American Film Institute
 
Alfred Hitchcock, universally acknowledged as “The Master of Suspense”, was born in the suburbs of London on August 13, 1899. Hitchcock’s first job within the film industry was as a title-card designer for the Famous Players Lasky film company. Hitchock went on to hold roles as assistant director, script writer, art director, and editor before directing his first solo film in 1925. In 1926, Hitchcock’s third film, The Lodger, was his first big success and established him as a maker of thrillers. Over the next fifty years, Hitchcock completed fifty additional feature films.

A History of Detective Stories: Film Noir

One of the sub-genres that defined classic American crime and detective movies was film noir, a style that was pervasive in detective films of the 1940s and 1950s. Film noir arose during the post-World War II period in the United States as a generation that fought in one of the most brutal conflicts the world had ever seen returned home to a changed America where jobs were scarce and the national mood seemed darker and more cynical than during the war itself. 

The Rappahannock Film Club Presents . . . Films @ the Library

The Rappahannock Film Club is partnering with the CRRL to bring you three great films this fall. The series starts Wednesday, October 7, with The Grapes of Wrath, screening from 7-9pm in the Headquarters Library theater.

"John Ford's memorable screen version of John Steinbeck's epic novel of the Great Depression--often regarded as the director's best film--stars Henry Fonda as Tom Joad." (1940, 128 minutes). See our Film Series page for more information about the series.

The Rappahannock Independent Film Festival

 The Rappahannock Independent Film Festival begins on Thursday, August 27. Thirty-two films from all over the world will be screened over the course of the 4 day festival, which also includes a film workshop, a musical performance, and social events. The Central Rappahannock Regional Library is proud to provide a venue for the film screenings and awards ceremony. Visit the RIFF web site, http://rifilmfestival.com/, to purchase tickets and for more information about the festival.

Sorting Out J.K. Rowling

The blockbuster summer film, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, is making new fans and having the long-time legions of readers thumbing through their beloved collections of the Potter chronicles. Old aficionados  and first-year initiates alike may delve deeper into J.K. Rowling and her world with our scintillating sources.

Sorting Out J.K. Rowling

Did you know?

  • She's known as Jo to her friends. No one's called her Joanne since she was a child, and only then if she was being naughty.
  • Rowling is pronounced "rolling."
  • Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone was first published in England as Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone.
  • Hermoine IS based on a real person-- J.K. Rowling!
  • The fantastic Ford Anglia featured in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets is similar to one owned by Sean Harris, her best friend at Wyedean School.

She was born in Chipping Sodbury, England on July 31, 1965. She loved to tell stories about rabbits to her younger sister, Di. When she was still young, she and her family moved to Winterbourne where two of her good friends were named Potter. A little later on, they moved out to the countryside, to the Forest of Dean. Her London-born parents had always wanted to move to the country, and Di and Jo (Jo is short for Joanne) enjoyed roaming the fields and along by the rivers there.

Front Page Films: Journalism in Films

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The news goes on for 24 hours a day.” -Charles Foster Kane in Citizen Kane

Blond Bombshells: Sirens of the Silver Screen

We kick off our Blond Bombshells Film Series on Wednesday, May 27, with a screening of "I'm No Angel" featuring Mae West and Cary Grant at 7pm, in the Headquarters Library theater.

Find out more about our film series bombshells Mae West, Jean Harlow, and Marilyn Monroe.

Blond Bombshells: Sirens of the Silver Screen

 
Mae West . . .
Jean Harlow . . .
Marilyn Monroe . . .

These three actresses are part of the iconic women in Hollywood’s history known as the blond bombshells. The blond bombshells craze began when Jean Harlow (“The Original Blond Bombshell”) appeared in the appropriately titled film Platinum Blonde (1931). After the film, peroxide flew off the shelves so women could mimic Harlow’s blonde tresses.