Powhatan Indians

The Powhatan Confederation

By Jane Kosa

Pocahontas, the Powhatan princess who befriended the Jamestown colonists, married the Englishman John Rolfe in 1614, and is believed by many to have saved John Smith's life -- that is why the world knows the Powhatan Confederacy. Her father, Powhatan, almost alone, united the small scattered Algonquian tribes of present-day Virginia and Delaware into a thirty tribe group in the late 1500s. We know this group as the Powhatan Confederacy. The Confederacy included 128 Algonquian villages and 20,000+ people at its peak in the early 1600s.

First People: The Early Indians of Virginia

By Keith Egloff and Deborah Woodward

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For students and general readers, Egloff (Virginia Department of Historic Resources) and Woodward, an editor and writing consultant, discuss the history of the Virginia Indians. They cover the tribes' everyday life, tools and other objects used (including illustrations), culture, contact with Europeans, and tribes today. This edition integrates recent events in the Indian community and new research.

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The Double Life of Pocahontas

By Jean Fritz

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A biography of the famous American Indian princess, emphasizing her life-long adulation of John Smith and the roles she played in two very different cultures.

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The Powhatan: A Confederacy of Native American Tribes

By Tracey Boraas

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Provides an overview of the past and present lives of the Powhatan people, tracing their customs, family life, history, culture, and relations with the United States government.

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Life of the Powhatan

By Rebecca Sjonger & Bobbie Kalman

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Discusses the Powhatan, their daily activities, customs, family life, religion, and the story of Pocahontas.

 

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The Story of Pocahontas

By Caryn Jenner

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Examines the life of the Indian princess Pocahontas and her contact with English settlers, especially John Smith.
A level 2 reader.
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Pocahontas: Princess of the New World

By Kathleen Krull

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She was the favored daughter of the Chief of the Powhatan Indians, and a girl in motion; always laughing, teasing, and dancing. But from the moment John Smith and the colonists of Jamestown set foot into her world in 1607, her life would change forever. She soon became an ambassador and peace keeper between the Powhatan and the colonists. Because of her curiosity and courage, Pocahontas became the bridge between the two worlds.
(From the publisher's description)

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Good Wives, Nasty Wenches & Anxious Patriarchs: Gender, Race, and Power in Colonial Virginia

By Kathleen M. Brown

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A feminist examination of the roles of women of different classes--lower class white, upper class white, slave, and Indian--in colonial Virginia, with much reliance on primary sources.

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Marlborough Point: In the Stream of History

Follow Marlborough Point Road down to the eastern tip of Stafford County, and you will pass by lots of new housing mushrooming into the forests and fields that were once favored by both the Native Americans and colonial settlers.  This section of the county is home to not just centuries of local history but millennia.

Who's saying what in Jamestown, Thomas Savage?

By Jean Fritz

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A biography of Thomas Savage, one of the early colonists of Jamestown, Virginia, who was sent to live among the Indians in order to learn their language and become an interpreter.
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