Weather

April Showers

Let's have fun in the rain with springtime games, crafts, and rainy day books.

Puddle-Jumping

It's raining. It's pouring. The old man might be snoring, but you're not. You're BORED. Tired of being in the house with nothing to do. There's no Cat in the Hat to get things going, but if you've got your galoshes and your rain coat (and a willing grownup) there's something you can do after the rain—puddle-jumping!
Run through the puddles very fast. Or, jump in big puddles as hard as you can. Play follow the leader and have a blast.

Books for the Early Elementary Set

Books for the Early Elementary Set

The mid-2000s were kind to my extended family when within a 12-month period, two nieces and a nephew joined it.  This year, they will all reach that extremely enjoyable early elementary age.  Their sense of humor is growing strong, their curiosity runs rampant, they’re fun to talk with and I enjoy hearing their newly formed perspectives and opinions!  Two of those children turn 7 this week and I can’t wait for them to see their birthday presents--books of course. 

Non-fiction books coincide with this group's avid curiosity!  My niece has such an avid interest in the weather that the first thing she did when she got home from school was check the forecast on her mom’s old phone.   She’s going to love the DK (Dorling Kindersley) Eye Wonder book called “Weather.”  When the DK books were first published they seemed too busy, but children loved them and I have learned over the years to appreciate them as well.  Heavy with photographs accompanied by small amounts of text, these books are a great and very accessible way to enjoy non-fiction!  She can scan the table of contents for subjects of interest or just flip through, reading about any picture that captures her attention.  Mine was caught by a photo of some funny looking water bubbles.  Did you know that raindrops aren’t tear-shaped, but instead “ actually look more like squashed buns?” 

The Year without Summer: 1816 and the Volcano that Darkened the World and Changed History by William K. Klingaman and Nicholas P. Klingaman

The Year without Summer: 1816

This volcanic explosion was worse than Vesuvius, Mount St. Helens, or Krakatoa. When Mount Tambora exploded in Indonesia in 1815, it started a chain of events that would alter the course of global history. In the Klingamans’ The Year without Summer, the authors detail how the resulting clouds of ash led to disastrous weather conditions which affected communities’ histories around the world… and led to the birth of Frankenstein.

Get Weather-Wise

How does rain happen? Long ago the Ashanti people believed that Anansi, the Spider, brought the rains that would put out fires in the jungle. In old Britain, the legendary Green Man was supposed to have rainmaking powers, and Zeus brought the rains for the ancient Greeks.

Today, we know that when warm, wet air rises into the sky and cools off, its water condenses out of the clouds as rain. Rain and snow can also happen when a batch of warm air meets a batch of cool air. The two kinds of air usually do not mix. The warm air is less dense than the cool air and will slide right over it. As the warm air goes higher, it cools off, and the moisture separates or condenses out of the cooled air and falls as a slow, steady rain.

Citizen Science -- No Degree Required

Citizen Science -- No Degree Required

You don't have to be a rocket scientist to help astronomers learn about the Universe. You don't need a degree in biology to help track bird populations.  Interested in what whale songs mean? You guessed it—you don't need to be an oceanographer to help scientists figure it out. All it takes is an interest and computer access and you can join the growing ranks of Citizen Scientists. Most projects provide tutorials or clear instructions on their websites. You don't even have to be an adult!

One windy Wednesday

By Phyllis Root and Helen Craig (Illustrator)

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When the wind blows so hard that it blows the quack right out of the duck, the oink out of the pig and so on, Bonnie Bumble works hard to get each animal's sound back where it belongs.
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Weather Station at the England Run Branch

Area residents have a new way to learn the strength of that last wind gust or how much rain fell during a recent downpour. The Central Rappahannock Regional Library system has a weather station located at its England Run branch in Stafford County! Anyone can view current temperature and humidity on the England Run branch page or get historical weather data for the past week or months by clicking through to the wunderground.com page for our location. Information is also shared with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) as part of their Citizen Weather Observer Program for use in their weather prediction models. 

Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs

By Judi Barrett

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Life is delicious in the town of Chewandswallow where it rains soup and juice, snows mashed potatoes, and blows storms of hamburgers--until the weather takes a turn for the worse.
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Civil War Weather in Virginia

Serious Civil War historians should find Robert Krick's book to be a very useful reference as weather is always a factor in battle. The former park service historian has compiled official information along with anecdotal references taken from soldiers' books, diaries, and letters as well as newspapers. Includes sunrise and sunset data from a period almanac.

Storm Warnings!

Recent storms cause me to remember a tornado many summers ago in Illinois. In Virginia, our "season," or the time when we are at greater risk for experiencing tornadoes, is July through August according to the Weather Channel, with the hurricane season running from June through November. There's no time like now to take some precautions.   Find out more about storm warnings.