Artists

Uncle Andy's by James Warhola

Uncle Andy's by James Warhola

Ah, the wacky uncle. He is an institution as old as the concept of family itself. Many can claim to have one, but few can say that his uncle is one of the most important artists of the 20th century. That's where Uncle Andy's, by James Warhola, figures in.

Before Warhol was a painter, a filmmaker, and a celebrity, he was Andrew Warhola. After college, he shortened his name and left his home in Pittsburgh to start an art career in Manhattan. But back in Steel City was Andy's older brother Paul, who worked in a junkyard and was father to seven children, one of whom was our author/illustrator James. Paul used a lot of the trash he found to make sculptures, and if he found something particularly unusual, he would bring it to Andy.

Painting American: The Rise of American Artists: Paris, 1867--New York, 1948

By Annie Cohen-Solal

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"Shortly after the Civil War, a resurgent America strode brashly onto the hallowed ground of the Paris salon to present its most distinguished painters in the Exposition Universelle of 1867. Their offereings included majestic Western waterfalls, magnificent portraits, sprawling landscapes--the cream of a nation ready to assert itself culturally as it had begun to do so economically. The Americans sat back to bask in anticipated applause. But their confidence would be shattered when the luminaries of the French Academy condemned the spectacle as being unworthy of the great nation that had produced it. The rebuke provoked widespread soul searching in America: Why was the land of Melville and Poe unable to produce paintings of comparable power? How was it to claim a place among nations producing art of real consequence?

"In this magnificent historical panorama, Annie Cohen-Solal shows how American pragmatism furnished the solution: Learn from the best. The French were then the undisputed masters of painting, and so to France the Americans went in hordes, apprenticing themselves in the studios of reknowned masters-- ... Cabanel, and others--or founding colonies such as the legendary one at Pont-Aven. From the seeds of their individual efforts would grow an extraordinary crop, one that included not only the great--Whistler, Cassatt, Sargent--but a legion of artists of all ranks who collectively pushed forward a bold new American enterprise. In two generations, Paris would be eclipsed, and the greatest French artists would begin coming to New York to be at the new center of everything."

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O'Keeffe and Stieglitz: An American Romance

By Benita Eisler

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"Introducing modernism to the New York art world, photographer Alfred Stieglitz was impresario to such notable American artists and photographers as John Marin, Paul Strand, Charles Demuth, and Marsden Hartley. In 1916 Georgia O'Keeffe became the only woman admitted to this exclusive art circle. An intense love affair with her mentor ensued... ." [Library Journal]

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Steampunk'd Books

Altered book - Doors

Wires were being bent, watches broken, and the scent of hot glue was in the air. The chatter of teens and a few adult artists filled the air as copiously as the junk that littered the table. The sounds and sights of books being “remade” were a little bit unnerving even to the librarians that planned the program, but there was no doubt about it – Steampunk’d Books at the Salem Church Library was a hit.

Uncle Andy's

By James Warhola

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The author describes a trip to see his uncle, the soon-to-be-famous artist Andy Warhol, and the fun that he and his family had on the visit. Suggested for ages 4 and up
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Story Painter : the Life of Jacob Lawrence

By John Duggleby

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A biography of the African American artist who grew up in the midst of the Harlem Renaissance and became one of the most renowned painters of the life of his people. Suggested for ages 7-12.
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Restless Spirit : the Life and Works of Dorothea Lange

By Elizabeth Partridge

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A biography of Dorothea Lange, whose photographs of migrant workers, Japanese American internees, and rural poverty helped bring about important social reforms. Suggested for ages 10-16.
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Norman Rockwell : Storyteller with a Brush

By Beverly Gherman

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Describes the life and work of the popular American artist who depicted both traditional and contemporary subjects, including children, family scenes, astronauts, and the poor. Suggested for ages 9-12.
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My Name is Georgia : a Portrait

By Jeannette Winter

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Presents, in brief text and illustrations, the life of the painter who drew much of her inspiration from nature. Suggested for ages 4-8.
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Linnea in Monet's Garden

By Cristina Bjork

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A little girl visits the home and garden of Claude Monet at Giverny, France, and learns about the artist's paintings and his life. The illustrations include photographs of the painter and his family as well as examples of his work. Suggested for ages 9-12.
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